What is Occupational Therapy?

What is Occupational Therapy? Profiles of an OTA Program Mission and Philosophy Faculty
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Occupational therapy practitioners provide services directed at enabling people to engage in the tasks and activities (the occupations) that are relevant to their daily lives.

A toddler's occupation is play. Play encourages growth, exploration and development of social and cognitive skills. When a child is unable to engage in play due to a physical or emotional limitation, their ability to grow and learn may be limited.

Through the use of adapted toys and games, the child is able to engage in their occupation of play. The occupation of a school-age child is learning. When a physical or emotional limitation exists, their ability to engage in learning is limited.

Occupation for an adult with cardiac problems may include learning to conserve energy while doing daily activities. An occupation for the elderly may be encouraging and promoting participation in activities as well as maintaining personal independence.

Occupational Therapy (OT) provides service to those individuals whose abilities to cope with their occupations (tasks) of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, physical injury or illness, or psychological and social disability.

Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants (COTA) work under the supervision of and in collaboration with Registered Occupational Therapists (OTR) addressing an individual's functional abilities and limitations in performance of daily occupations. The occupation of self-care, for example, includes the activities of bathing, shaving, dressing and feeding, each of which requires varying degrees of skill in motor, perception, cognition and psychosocial functioning.

The COTA's responsibilities include providing purposeful activity to restore lost physical, cognitive and psychosocial skills, training in the use of assisting devices, and adapting environments and occupations to enable successful and safe performance.

For admission requirements please go to: www.sunyorange.edu/admissions/programs/healthreq.shtml

Puzzle Piece Sensory Integration: A "Playshop" for Elementary Educators
  A workshop, offered by OTA Program faculty, designed to heighten educators' awareness of sensory integration issues in the classroom. These issues can interfere with the academic success of children in a typical classroom setting. This workshop is held in an effort to assist educators to think "outside the box," and to give them strategies to deal with sensory integration issues as they arise.

In accordance with federal regulations, the New York State human rights law and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Orange County Community College does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, religion, creed, disability, marital status, veteran status, national origin, race, gender, or sexual orientation in employment or in the educational programs and activities which it operates.

Occupational Therapy Assistant Program:

(845) 341-4323

Flo Hannes, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Chair
115 South Street Middletown, NY 10940
(845) 341-4323
E-mail

Margaret Boyle, Department Secretary
(845) 341-4291
E-mail

Mildred Consolo-Melchionne, COTA
Academic Fieldwork Coordinator
(845) 341-4322
E-mail