September 2014 - Upcoming Events

Date Event
Type
Title Campus Building
8/13 - 10/27 Exhibit Artists of Excellence ~ Works by Fay Wood NBG Kaplan Hall, foyer of Mindy Ross Gallery
8/18 - 10/2 Exhibit Pen and Paint NBG Kaplan Hall, Mindy Ross Gallery
8/19 - 10/9 Exhibit AntARTica: Exploring Art & Science at the Bottom of the World! MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
9/3 - 10/1 Exhibit Exploration MDTN Orange Hall Gallery Fringe
9/15 Lecture 19th Century Fortification of the East Coast of the U.S. - The Rise & Fall of a Construction Type - The Unit Masonry Fortress MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum
9/18 Lecture 'Deep in the Mire and...Divided as to its Releaf': The Founders, the People, and the Necessity of the Constitution MDTN Middletown Library, Gilman Center
9/23 Lecture Antarctica: Evolution of Marine Living Fossils and their Modern Importance MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
9/27 & 10/2 Film Manhattan Short Film Festival NBG/MDTN Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room/ Middletown Library, Gilman Center
9/30 Lecture The Electoral College: How We Got It, Why We Still Have It, and What Were the Founders Thinking? NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room

Artists of Excellence ~ Works by Fay Wood

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 to Monday, October 27, 2014
The Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Fay Wood, sculptressThe Artists of Excellence exhibit series opens the new academic year with a display of works by artist Fay Wood of Saugerties.  Wood paints in several media, but it is her sculptures which will be on view in the large vitrine glass case in the Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery at SUNY Orange’s Kaplan Hall located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY.

The Artists of Excellence exhibits, initiated to spotlight highly talented regional artists, gives the college community and the community-at-large the privilege of viewing exquisite pieces in various media by professional artists. This show, which is free and open to the public, will be on view August 13 through October 27, 2014 8am to 8pm, Monday through Thursday and till 4pm on Friday, plus 4 to 8pm on Last Saturdays, a Newburgh arts initiative.

Dancing Animal, found object sculpture by Fay WoodWood uses a meticulous, process-oriented approach that gives the many found objects and materials she gathers, a new life by transforming them into art. She uses wood, metal, wire, paper, and paint. Her works demonstrate the creativity necessary to conceptualize these objects and materials being combined to become totally different and, indeed, sculptures.

Wood has shown her works in Florence, Italy and Cologne, Germany. Her artworks also have been in many solo, group, and invitational shows in the United States.

Fay Wood attended Massachusetts College of Art and studied with Sculptor Wolfgang Behl at his studio. She also participated in classes at the Art Students League and the School of Visual Arts both in NYC. In 2004, she was the winner of the Proskauer Prize given by the National Sculpture Society. But, she states that most of all she is proud of being in the “generation of women of transition who were trying to be everything at once!” She certainly attained that in art.

Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-9386/4891.

Images, top to bottom: Fay Wood, sculptress; Dancing Animal, found object sculpture by Fay Wood

[ to top ]


Pen and Paint

This Big Dress, chapbook by Sandra GraffMonday, August 18, 2014 to Thursday, October 2, 2014
Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

The Graff sisters are talented artists, one literary and one visual. Together, their works make a unique exhibit through which viewers may be able to realize how many of their works complement each other.

Pen and Paint is the title of the dual show by Sandra Graff, poet, and Barbara Graff, painter, and the exhibit is on view in the Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall, August 18 through October 2, 2014.

Sandra Graff, poetSandra Graff is the author of many poems some of which are contained in her two chapbooks, This Big Dress and Girl in Garden.  Her poems have been published in Rhino Poetry Journal, Georgetown Review, Blueline, The Fourth River, Home Planet News, and Copperfield Review, among others. She is an associate professor of English at SUNY Orange, and during the academic year, she teaches two poetry courses on contemporary poetry and creative writing poetry.  Her Hudson Valley home offers a view of the Shawangunk Ridge, a setting of inspiration itself.  She holds a Master of Arts in Teaching from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Earth Watch, mixed media by Barbara GraffBarbara Graff is a fine artist and mannequin make-up specialist. Her fascination with the human face is demonstrated through her paintings as well in her commercial work. The three-dimensionality of her works on canvas with the inclusion of masks and textures, plus found objects and driftwood as well as oils and acrylics, bring her works to life and certainly grab the attention of the viewer. Her artworks have been shown in many venues in the Hudson Valley and the New York metropolitan area. Her mannequin make-up designing in the fashion industry has brought her work to public eye in such stores as Bergdorf Goodman, Barney's New York, Bloomingdales, Saks Fifth Avenue, as well as several other major stores in the USA and abroad. She lives in the Catskill Region, near Woodstock. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Hofstra University.

Barbara Graff, painterThe art reception, during which Joy Zelada of Newburgh will play classical guitar, is scheduled from 4 to 8pm on Saturday, August 30 at the Mindy Ross Gallery. The reception also includes SUNY Orange as a gallery on the Last Saturdays’ events in Newburgh.

Then, on Thursday, October 2 the closing reception will center on a poetry reading of original works by Sandra Graff starting at 7pm in the Great Room which is next to the Mindy Ross Gallery. Designed as a multimedia event entitled “Pen & Paint Coffee House,” it will include refreshments, a booksigning by Sandra Graff, and a musical interlude.

The community is welcome to come to these free events.

Gallery hours are 9am to 4pm, Monday through Friday, plus 4 to 8pm on Last Saturdays, a Newburgh arts initiative. SUNY Orange’s Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY. Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-9386/4891.

Images (photos provided by Sandra Graff and Barbara Graff), top to bottom: This Big Dress, chapbook by Sandra Graff; Sandra Graff, poet; Earth Watch, mixed media by Barbara Graff; Barbara Graff, painter

[ to top ]


AntARTica: Exploring Art & Science at the Bottom of the World!

Tuesday, August 19, 2014 to Thursday, October 9, 2014
Orange Hall Gallery (MDTN)

Psammosphaera, watercolor by Sam BowserHave you ever known anyone who has gone to Antarctica, let alone someone who dives through drilled holes in the ice more than 180 times? In fact, why would anyone do that? …for the sake of science. A man who grew up on a country road in the Town of Wallkill has gone to Antarctica twenty times to perform scientific research dives to bring back small specimens of foraminifera. Sam Bowser, PhD, is a polar biologist, protistologist, and art/science enthusiast specializing on "forams"—unicellular aquatic creatures that play a crucial role in marine environments. Some may recognize him as one of the characters featured in Werner Herzog's documentary "Encounters at the End of the World" or for being the featured scientist on the Discovery Channel’s “Forces of Nature.”  His work has shown that Antarctica is populated with forams that evolved hundreds of millions of years ago. They are like dinosaurs that are still around. A new genus of Foraminifera, was named Bowseria in his honor in 2008. And, Bowser Valley, lying East of Crawford Valley in St. Johns Range, Victoria Land, Antarctica, was named in 2005.

Pressure Ridges, oil by Laura Von RoskArtist Laura Von Rosk travelled to Antarctica in the fall of 2011 to work with Dr. Bowser and his research team. She was there to assist with the scientific research and dive teams and, in one way or another, incorporate this experience into her own work as a visual artist. Von Rosk is well-known for her small surreal paintings of expansive landscapes often lush with vegetation. After her Antarctic trip, icy scenery and landscape of many shades of white have become prevalent in her work. By recombining, emphasizing, manipulating, or inventing elements of the landscape, she explores the tension between natural forms and memory.

Orange Hall Gallery is the venue for an exhibit that was inspired by the expedition to Antarctica. Entitled AntARTica: Exploring Art & Science at the Bottom of the World! the show will be on view August 19 through October 9, 2014. Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Fridays till 6pm. Bowser’s watercolors of the jewel-like Foraminifera and Von Rosk’s oil paintings of her interpretations of the Antarctic vista along with specimens plus short video documentaries by exploration team members Hilary Hudson and Henry Kaiser comprise this fascinating educational opportunity.

In addition, Bowser and Von Rosk will give a presentation on the research work on forams in Antarctica as well as art-science projects. This will take place on Thursday, October 9 from 7 to 9pm during the closing reception. The reception and exhibit are free and open to the public. Also, Dr. Bowser will present a lecture with 3D slides on forams in Orange Hall Gallery on September 23 at 7pm.

Sam Bowser, PhD, polar biologist, protistologist, and art/science enthusiast, and Laura Von Rosk, artist, in AntarcticaLaura Von Rosk received her MFA from the University of Pennsylvania, and her BFA from SUNY Purchase.  Her paintings have been exhibited nationally in both solo and group shows.  Her awards include a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Painting, grants from the Pollack-Krasner Foundation, the Bernheim Foundation in Clermont, KY, a Full Fellowship residency at the Vermont Studio Center, and residencies at Yaddo, Blue Mountain Center, The Millay Colony, Centrum, and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony. She is director of the Lake George Arts Project’s Courthouse Gallery.

Sam Bowser graduated with an AAS degree from SUNY Orange. He received a BS in biological sciences and a PhD in cell biology from SUNY Albany. He has done extensive post-doctoral work on cell biology and polar biology at Wadsworth Center, NYS Department of Health and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, respectively. He has received numerous awards and honors including the Science Teachers Association of New York Executive Award.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown on the SUNY Orange campus.  Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-4891.

Images, top to bottom: Psammosphaera, watercolor by Sam Bowser; Pressure Ridges, oil by Laura Von Rosk; Sam Bowser, PhD, polar biologist, protistologist, and art/science enthusiast, and Laura Von Rosk, artist, in Antarctica

[ to top ]


Exploration

Joan L. Mamelok, artist/printmakerWednesday, September 3, 2014 to Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Orange Hall Gallery Fringe (MDTN)

Nana’s, copper etching by Joan L. MamelokA solo art show, Exploration: a Representation of Various Printmaking Techniques, set for September 3 through October 1, 2014 features the works of Joan L. Mamelok. Mamelok grew up in Middletown and now lives in Seattle, WA. She holds a BA, BS, and MS in Philosophy from Hamilton College, Nursing from Cornell University, and Community Health/Teaching from Boston College, respectively. But, it was her studies in Advanced Print-making Techniques at Pratt Fine Arts Center, Seattle, that fine-tuned the focus of her artistic creativity.  She presently teaches printmaking at the Kirkland Arts Center, Kirkland, WA, and will give a master class at SUNY Orange.

Her works have been shown in many exhibitions in the state of Washington. Much of her work is abstract and conveys movement sometimes related to the music she always has on when she works. She enjoys the variety of techniques that print-making offers which allows her to add components. She often puts a piece Singing the Teal Blues, copper etching by Joan L. Mamelokthrough the press several times or without a press she rubs the paper with a metal spoon or door knob, or traditional, hand-held Japanese baren to give complicated effects.

Mamelok states, “I work spontaneously with line, rounded shapes, and color. I am particularly drawn to the simultaneous feeling of what is microscopic and cosmic. I feel the tiniest part of myself as a reflection of the overwhelming-ness of the universe.”  Additionally, she remarks, “I work intuitively.... some people work narratively, but I am never consciously telling a story... doesn't mean there isn't one there, but it is not my intent.”

The Exploration exhibit will be on view in Orange Hall Gallery Fringe Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Friday 9am to 6pm. This is free and open to the public. Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown. Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-4891.

Images, top to bottom: Joan L. Mamelok, artist/printmaker; Nana’s, copper etching by Joan L. Mamelok; Singing the Teal Blues, copper etching by Joan L. Mamelok

[ to top ]


19th Century Fortification of the East Coast of the U.S. - The Rise & Fall of a Construction Type - The Unit Masonry Fortress

Monday, September 15, 2014 at 7pm
Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, room 010, Rowley Center for Science & Engineering (MDTN)

Andrew Warren, RA LEEDAP, architectLocal architect, Andrew Warren, RA LEEDAP of David Wieboldt, Architects, Middletown will share his knowledge of architecture, design, and sustainability, and his love of history in the first in a series of architecture lectures at the newly opened Rowley Center for Science & Engineering [RCSE] at SUNY Orange. Warren is an adjunct assistant professor in the college’s architectural technology degree program and also holds a bachelor in architecture degree from Pratt Institute.

Entitled 19th C Fortification of the East Coast of the U.S. - The Rise & Fall of a Construction Type - The Unit Masonry Fortress, the lecture will cover specific information about forts along the east coast of the United States, and how they shaped history during their primetime functionality.

Fort Pulaski, Savannah, GAWarren will also explain how technology in every era evolves and concurrently security changes with time and often drives technology with its needs.

This presentation is free and open to the public and will be held on Monday, September 15, 2014 at 7pm in Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, room 010 on the ground floor of  RCSE accessed via the parking area and entrance at the corner of East Conkling and Wawayanda Avenues, Middletown, NY. Architects and engineers will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU for lecture attendance.

Questions may be directed: (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images (photos provided by Andrew Warren), top to bottom: Andrew Warren, RA LEEDAP, architect; Fort Pulaski, Savannah, GA

[ to top ]


'Deep in the Mire and...Divided as to its Releaf': The Founders, the People, and the Necessity of the Constitution

Celebrating the US Constitution mini-series

Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 7pm
Gilman Center, Library Room 130 (MDTN)

Assistant Professor of History, author, and scholar Michael B. McCoy of the Global Studies Department at SUNY Orange will offer insight into the background and understanding of the development of the United States Constitution in a lecture he will deliver on Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 7pm. Entitled 'Deep in the Mire and...Divided as to its Releaf': The Founders, the People, and the Necessity of the Constitution  (the main title originating in an 18th century political cartoon, hence the spelling), the presentation will take place in the Gilman Center, room 130 of the Library, located at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue, Middletown, NY. This is the first of two lectures in the mini-series “Celebrating the US Constitution.”

Looking GlassDuring the lecture, McCoy will explore the nature of two documents which were the bases of the laws and framework of United States government at its infancy: the Articles of Confederation, ratified by the Continental Congress on March 1, 1781 and the Constitution ratified on June 21, 1788. McCoy will focus on the issue of necessity, because, as he states, “depending on which historical figure you ask—James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Melancton Smith, Robert Yates, or a poor tailor named Petrikin, you get widely different answers as to why the US needed a new frame of government and what this new government meant to the ‘people.’”

The author of The Anxious Republic: An Interpretive Anthology of the New American Nation,1788-1848, McCoy has also written numerous journal articles, book chapters, review essays, and book reviews, and has an article, an essay, and a book in progress. Michael B. McCoy holds a BA in History from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown where he was awarded Summa Cum Laude, Phi Alpha Theta, Phi Kappa Phi and was named a University Scholar and received a History Department Award, and a Hefley Scholarship. He also has an MA in History from the University of Pittsburgh at Pittsburgh. In 2010, he was honored with the SUNY Orange Student Senate Excellence in Teaching Award.

The lecture is free and open to the public and parking is nearby in various college lots. Questions may be addressed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Image: Looking Glass

[ to top ]


Antarctica: Evolution of Marine Living Fossils and their Modern Importance

Sam Bowser Ice Dive, Explorers Cove, Antarctica, underwater color photograph by Shawn HarperTuesday, September 23, 2014 at 7pm
Orange Hall Gallery (MDTN)

What is foraminifera [forams] and what, if anything, can this unicellular creature produce that may benefit human beings?

On Tuesday, September 23, 2014, you will have the opportunity to find out the answer if you come to the 7pm lecture, which includes 3D slides, by polar explorer/protistologist Sam Bowser, PhD. Dr. Bowser will explain the findings of Pycnogonid (Sea Spider) Colossendeis australis, photograph of specimen by Stuart Stileshis research when he speaks in Orange Hall Gallery where his exhibit of specimens, drawings, paintings, video, and photographs is on view.  Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown on the SUNY Orange campus.

During the lecture, Antarctica: Evolution of Marine Living Fossils and their Modern Importance, Dr. Bowser will define the roles of foraminifera in the Earth's carbon cycle and as carnivores in past and present marine environments.  He will also address an interesting and useful finding in his research that may prove to be beneficial: possible biotechnological uses of foraminifera. Certain forams secrete a "superglue" type of substance that might be useful to industrial and medical (sutureless surgery) applications.

Cornuspira Antarctica, watercolor and gesso by Sam BowserDr. Sam Bowser, a specialist in the physiological ecology & evolution of foraminifera, has led numerous research expeditions to Antarctica where he has made 180 ice dives. You may recognize him as a featured character in Werner Herzog's documentary "Encounters at the End of the World." He has been the recipient of many awards including the Science Teachers Association of New York Executive Award for his steadfast advocacy of science education. Bowser Valley, lying East of Crawford Valley in St. Johns Range, Victoria Land, was named by US-ACAN in recognition of his research in Antarctica. Bowseria spp., a new genus of Foraminifera, was named in honor of him. Even so, he is a relaxed and engaging speaker and still the adventurer who grew up on the road which bears his family’s name in the Town of Wallkill. He will welcome questions.

A graduate of SUNY Orange with an AAS degree, he holds a BS in Biological Sciences and a PhD in Cell Biology from SUNY Albany. In addition, he has done extensive post-doctoral work on cell biology at Wadsworth Center of the NYS Department of Health and polar biology study at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

This event is free and open to the public, and offered by Cultural Affairs. Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-4891.

Images, top to bottom: Sam Bowser Ice Dive, Explorers Cove, Antarctica, underwater color photograph by Shawn Harper; Pycnogonid (Sea Spider) Colossendeis australis, photograph of specimen by Stuart Stiles; Cornuspira Antarctica, watercolor and gesso by Sam Bowser

[ to top ]


Manhattan Short Film Festival

Saturday, September 27, 2014 at 7pm
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 6:15pm
Gilman Center, Library Room 130 (MDTN)

Film is an artform that offers many choices: short—long, serious—comedic, plain and low budget—special effects and very expensive, good quality—poor with little substance. Some grab your interest while others make you hope for a quick ending.

Manhattan Short Film FestivalHere’s a great option: a short film festival. The films are, indeed, short.  Getting bored just doesn’t happen. The subjects and types of the films are extremely different, too. Now, in its 17th year, the Manhattan Short Film Festival [MSFF] offers families and friends ages 15-70+ the opportunity of viewing the ten Finalists [out of nearly 600 entries] and then voting on their favorites. It is fun and inexpensive.

The 2014 MSFF takes place worldwide, September 26 through October 5.  The filmmakers represent eight countries around the globe. Films range in length from 8 to 18 minutes.  Two hundred fifty venues on six continents are participating and two of those are in Orange County, one in Newburgh and one in Middletown and both at SUNY Orange.

The following list of the ten finalists includes film titles, runtimes, filmmakers/directors and their home countries:

Title Runtime Filmmaker/Director Home Country
97 % 8 minutes Ben Brand Netherlands
On/Off 14 minutes Thierry Lorenzi France
Crime - The Animated Series 14 minutes Alix Lambert & Sam Chou USA
La Carnada 13 minutes Josh Soskin Mexico
On The Bridge 12 minutes Sameer Patel England
Mend and Make Do 8 minutes Bexie Bush England
Shift 11 minutes James Croke Australia
The Bravest, The Boldest 17 minutes Moon Molson USA
The Fall 15 minutes Andreas Thaulow Norway
Rhino Full Throttle 15 minutes Erik Schmitt Germany

On Saturday, September 27 at 7pm, the ten films will be screened in the Orange County Trust Company Great Room in Kaplan Hall, which is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh. Free, secure parking is available in the garage under Kaplan Hall via the entrance at 81 First Street. On Thursday, October 2 at 6:15pm a screening of the films is scheduled at the Gilman Center for International Education in the Library at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue, Middletown.  Free parking is closeby in several lots.

General admission is $5, with students allowed free entrance at both venues. Tickets are available at the door and online at http://sunyorange.edu/arts_comm/ticketing.shtml

An estimated 100,000 individuals attend the 800+ screenings. The MSFF 2014 is not going to Cable TV or Video On Demand. It is indeed a ten-day Cinematic Global Event. One of the most popular aspects of the festival comes at the end of each screening. The audience becomes the judge. Filmgoers are given voting sheets on which the film titles and actors are listed. Then, they are asked to vote for their favorites—Best Film and Best Actor. Each venue tabulates and on October 6 at 10am, the winners are announced in New York City.

Come and be part of this intercontinental event!

The Manhattan Short Film Festival is brought to Orange County by SUNY Orange Cultural Affairs. Questions may be directed to (845) 341-9386/4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Image: Manhattan Short Film Festival

[ to top ]


The Electoral College: How We Got It, Why We Still Have It, and What Were the Founders Thinking?

Celebrating the US Constitution mini-series

Tuesday, September 30, 2014 at 7:30pm
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Every four years United States citizens cast their votes to elect a president. Is this statement true? Do individual votes really elect the president? The answer is “no.” Actually, the votes go towards electing Electors from each state who vote for president. Through this process, occasionally, the electoral vote differs in final results from the total of individual votes whereby, a candidate with fewer votes can become president. Candidates and office holders alike seemingly pay lip service to the situation saying that it must be eliminated, and then nothing ever comes of it.

Mark Weston, journalist/writer/speaker/playwright/attorney/authorOn Tuesday, September 30, 2014 at 7:30pm, Mark Weston will address these questions and explain the process in his lecture The Electoral College: How We Got It, Why We Still Have It, and What Were the Founders Thinking? Weston, who has authored several books, including soon-to-be-published Not Again! which focuses on the US presidential election system, will discuss the workings of The Electoral College and the Constitutional context of Article 2, Section 1 and the 12th Amendment.

This lecture is the second in the mini-series dealing with topics on the Constitution, and is presented in celebration of US Constitution Day. The venue is Kaplan Hall’s Orange County Trust Company Great Room 101. Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets in Newburgh, NY. Free and secure parking is available in the garage via the First Street entrance. The program is free and open to the public.

Mark Weston is a journalist/writer/speaker/playwright/attorney, and author. He has a BA in History from Brown University and spent a year at the London School of Economics. He then went on to earn a law degree from the University of Texas. He has been a lawyer for ABC Television and a journalist for ABC News. In addition, he has written articles for the New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the New York Daily News. His one-character play, Meet George Orwell, has been performed at Trinity College, Oxford and the John Kennedy Presidential Library Theatre in Boston as well as Off-Broadway. He was a visiting scholar at the King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and from that stay he wrote Prophets and Princes: Saudi Arabia from Muhammad to the Present. He lived in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan and near Tokyo while researching and writing The Land and People of Pakistan and Giants of Japan, respectively. He also wrote a children’s book, Honda: The Boy Who Dreamed of Cars. And, in 1991, Weston won enough money on TV’s Jeopardy! to start a company that makes children’s geographical jigsaw puzzles which he, in turn, sold later to a larger puzzle company. He recently released a TV news game, Scoop!, as an app for the iPhone, the iPad, and Android.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs: (845)341-9386 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Image: Mark Weston, journalist/writer/speaker/playwright/attorney/author

[ to top ]

menu_temp


Contact Us:
Dorothy Szefc
Coordinator of Cultural Affairs
(845) 341-4891
cultural@sunyorange.edu

All Cultural Affairs Events are open to the public and all buildings are universally accessible.

NOTE: All artists' images on these pages are copyrighted and are used by kind permission of the artists. Please do not download, reproduce or use without permission.