November 2014 - Upcoming Events

Date Event
Type
Title Campus Building
10/10 - 11/20 Exhibit A New Deal for Artists ~ artworks of the WPA NBG Kaplan Hall, Mindy Ross Gallery
10/16 - 11/23 Exhibit Waterways & Wildlife MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
10/30 - 2/5 Exhibit Artist of Excellence ~ Works by David Nolan NBG Kaplan Hall, foyer of Mindy Ross Gallery
11/5 Lecture Habitat Gardening for Monarchs and other Butterflies MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
11/11 Film RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
11/12 Lecture Finding Monhagen Brook MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
11/13 Lecture Current Issues of the Criminal Justice System Encountering the Mentally Ill MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum
11/14 Master Class Jazz Guitar with guitar greats John Stowell and James Emery MDTN Orange Hall, Room 23
11/17 Master Class Discipline vs Curiosity: how much do I really want to practice this thing? MDTN Orange Hall, Room 23
11/18 Lecture A Case Study of Sam's Point Preserve Conservation Center, Cragsmoor, NY MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum
11/19 Lecture Wetlands: Their Importance and Preservation MDTN Orange Hall Gallery
11/20 Concert Folk Music: the Voice to the People of the Times
The Great Depression and The Occupy Movement
NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
11/20 Master Class Artists of the WPA: a community of American artists NBG Kaplan Hall, Mindy Ross Gallery
11/20 Lecture A New Deal for Artists NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
11/23 Concert Windy Classics for Piano and Winds with selections by Beethoven and Mozart MDTN Orange Hall Theatre

A New Deal for Artists ~ artworks of the WPA

WPA Series

Friday, October 10, 2014 to Thursday, November 20, 2014
Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Old Fish Wharves, Rockport, oil by Thomas C. ColeThrough the generous cooperation of Livingston Arts in Mount Morris, NY, artworks commissioned by the Works Progress Administration [WPA] during the Great Depression will be on display in the Mindy Ross Gallery in Kaplan Hall in the exhibit A New Deal for Artists ~ artworks of the WPA from October 10 through November 20, 2014.

The WPA was one of the many programs invented in the 1930s by the federal government’s “New Deal.” WPA artists made paintings, sculptures and murals. By allowing artists to continue creating art and make a living wage, the federal government fostered the beginnings of a community of American artists which eventually became a dominant force after World War II making New York City and the United States, the new center of the art world.

Livingston Arts now serves as a permanent home for 230 works of WPA art. The artworks were originally allocated to Mount Morris Tuberculosis Hospital in the 1930s.

The exhibit is comprised of twenty-five paintings of still lifes, and land and seascapes mostly depicting the Hudson Valley and Long Island plus the Berkshires and Central Park. The following are the artists whose works are included.

American Farm, oil by Alfred S. MiraInez Abernathy

Frederick Adler

John Alger

Dayton Branfield

Thomas C. Cole (nephew of the Hudson River School Thomas Cole)

Stephen Csoka

Isaac Fastovsky

Simon Fidaroff

Benjamin Gordon

Louis Harris

Japanese Garden, oil by Roy KadowskiLeon Hartl

Charles Henning

Roy Kadowaki

Alfred S. Mira

Claude Patterson

Mario Pecci

William Preachen

Leo Sakardi

Carl Sprinchorn

Samuel Theobald

Charles Willmont

Ilena Winograd

An oil painting by Isaac Fastovsky entitled Tunnel by the Hudson is on display. Any viewer knowing the location of the piece, is asked to write a note in the gallery book or e-mail cultural@sunyorange.edu   

The Mindy Ross Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9am to 4pm. In addition, the gallery will be open through 8:30pm on Wednesdays, Oct 22, 29, Tuesday, November 11, and till 9pm on Thursday, November 20, and 4-7pm on Saturday, October 25, and 2 to 5pm on Sunday, October 26.

A series of related programs including two lectures, a master class, and a mini-concert is scheduled in October and November. And on the evening of November 20, a lecture examining the impact on culture of the WPA on the youthful, economically strained United States will be followed by the closing reception. All are free and open to the public. 

SUNY Orange’s Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY. Secure and free parking can be found in the garage under Kaplan Hall and accessed via First Street. Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and 845-341-9386

Images, top to bottom: Old Fish Wharves, Rockport, oil by Thomas C. Cole; American Farm, oil by Alfred S. Mira; Japanese Garden, oil by Roy Kadowaki

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Waterways & Wildlife ~ our region’s wetlands, ponds, lakes, kills, creeks, brooks & native flora & fauna

Waterways & Wildlife Series

Shadows of the Past, oil & mixed media by Barbara GraffThursday, October 16, 2014 to Sunday, November 23, 2014
Orange Hall Gallery (MDTN)

An exhibit of paintings, photographs, sculptures, mixed media, and maps is the central component of a series including three lectures and a master class during October and November. Waterways & Wildlife ~ our region’s wetlands, ponds, lakes, kills, creeks, brooks & native flora & fauna is the title of this exhibit of over 100 works by 30 artists. The works ranging in size from very small to exceptionally large can be viewed in Orange Hall Gallery. The reception is scheduled for Saturday, November 8 from 3 to 5:30pm with music provided by Joy Kissane, pianist.

Great Blue Heron, oil by Mitchell SalerIncluded in this display are photographs of bald eagles on the wall of Orange Hall Gallery Fringe. These will complement the master class on the restoration of the bald eagle to New York State.

Historic Hudson, oil by Joyce V. GarrettThe Monarch butterfly, the watershed of the underground waterway of Middletown – Monhagen Brook, and the Basha Kill Wetlands are the topics of the lectures.

Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Fridays 9am to 6pm, plus Saturday, October 18 6:30 to 10pm; Saturday, October 25 10am to noon; Saturday, November 8 3 to 6pm; Wednesdays, November 5, 12, 19 until 8:30pm; Sunday, November 23 2:30 to 5pm.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown on the SUNY Orange campus.  The exhibit, reception, lectures, and master class are free and open to the public. So, come, view the exhibit, learn at a lecture or master class, and come again.

For further information, contact Cultural Affairs at cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-4891.

Images, top to bottom: Shadows of the Past, oil & mixed media by Barbara Graff; Great Blue Heron, oil by Mitchell Saler; Historic Hudson, oil by Joyce V. Garrett

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Habitat Gardening for Monarchs and other Butterflies

Waterways & Wildlife Series

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 at 7pm
Orange Hall Gallery (MDTN)

Janet Allen, PhD, president & co-founder of the Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes chapter of Habitat Gardening in Central New YorkJanet Allen, PhD, is a Wild One! She is, in fact, president & co-founder of the Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes chapter of Habitat Gardening in Central New York. She is an expert on Monarch butterflies and other butterflies. She will come to Orange Hall Gallery on Wednesday, November 5, 2014 at 7pm as the first of three Wednesday evening lecturers on topics related to Waterways and Wildlife, the theme of the large exhibit presently on view in the gallery. “We're at the top of this very shaky pyramid. Insects are fundamental to a healthy ecosystem, and that works its way up through the food chain,” explains Dr. Allen.

The lecture is, not surprisingly, Habitat Gardening for Monarchs and other Butterflies. Indeed, this is a timely topic since Monarchs were listed among the top 10 most threatened species for 2010 by the World Wildlife Federation, and scientists this year state that the decline in Monarchs is increasingly alarming.  The World Wildlife Fund and the Mexican government said at a news conference early in 2014 that the span of forest inhabited by the overwintering Monarchs shrank to a bare 1.65 acres—the equivalent of about one and a quarter football fields. Not only was that a record low, but it was just 56 percent of last year’s total, which was itself a record low. At their peak in 1996, the Monarchs occupied nearly 45 acres of forest.

Monarch, photo by Janet AllenOne of the main causes of this situation is habitat loss due to housing, industrial, and farming development in North America. “Bees and butterflies lay eggs on particular host plants,” states Allen. “The larvae of Monarch butterflies eat only milkweed,” she continues. “Using native plants doesn't mean simply not mowing your lawn. You can have a formal yard and use native plants.” She explains, “Since wildlife and native plants grow up together, they are well-suited to each other, and keeping these natural factors are important for survival.”

Janet Allen is a Habitat Steward Volunteer and Global Warming Ambassador for the National Wildlife Federation and was named Environmentalist of the Year by Environmental Advocates of New York. She holds a BA in Science and Math from SUNY Binghamton and a BS in Computer Science from Syracuse University. In addition, her graduate degrees all from Syracuse University include an MS in Education, an MS in Computer Engineering, and a PhD in Education.

Come and learn from Dr. Allen through her lecture and Q&A. View the exhibit while you are in the gallery. The exhibit and related events are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown on the SUNY Orange campus.  Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845)341-4891.

Images (photos provided by Janet Allen), top to bottom: Janet Allen, PhD, president & co-founder of the Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes chapter of Habitat Gardening in Central New York; Monarch, photo by Janet Allen

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RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 at 6:15pm
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

The documentary film RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope will be screened in the Orange County Trust Great Room, Kaplan Hall, SUNY Orange, on Tuesday, November 11, 2014 starting at 6:15pm. The film’s producer and director, Larry Shore, PhD, who grew up in Johannesburg, South Africa, will give background on the film and welcome questions in a post-screening discussion.

Chief Albert Luthuli, Nobel Peace Prize winner and banned President of the African National Congress, and Robert F. Kennedy, SenatorFeaturing never before seen archival footage, combined with interviews in South Africa and the United States, the film explains the little-known story of Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s influential June 1966 visit to South Africa. The film follows Kennedy during that five-day period, showing his meeting with the Nobel Peace Prize winner and banned President of the African National Congress, Chief Albert Luthuli, as well as Kennedy’s famous “Day of Affirmation” speech at the University of Cape Town on June 6, considered by many to be the greatest speech of Kennedy’s career.

At a time when few in the world knew what was happening in South Africa, Kennedy’s presence gave hope and courage to the opponents of Apartheid including Martin Luther King Jr., who had linked the struggle for Civil Rights with the fight against Apartheid.

"This fascinating and powerful documentary film captures beautifully a small but momentous slice of the parallel struggles for equality, dignity and human rights in the United States and South Africa. We are reminded not only of how these two national struggles intersected nearly half a century ago, but also how -- to paraphrase Robert F. Kennedy's own words in South Africa -- each individual, standing up for an ideal, can send out a ripple of hope, and millions of these small ripples coming together can eventually 'sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.'"– Larry Diamond, Director, Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, Hoover Institution & Freeman Spogli Institute, Stanford University

The story is still very relevant to the ongoing struggles for democracy, justice, and human rights around the world today.

Larry Shore, PhD, documentary film producer/director and professor of film & media at Hunter CollegeDr. Larry Shore immigrated to the United States in 1973. Active in the Anti-Apartheid Movement in the United States in the 1980’s, in 1991 he co-founded the South African-American Organization (SAAO), the largest South African expatriate organization in the US. He was the Director of the Hunter College/University of Cape Town Partnership Program.  He received his BA from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, and holds an MA in Political Science -- International Relations from the University of Pennsylvania. He earned his PhD in Communications from Stanford University.

Dr. Shore is a professor of film & media at Hunter College. His colleague Tami Gold, filmmaker, artist, and professor at Hunter College, co-directed this film with him.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, where free secure parking is available in its garage via the First Street entrance. 

This event is free and open to the public. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845) 341-9386 or cultural@sunyorange.edu

Images, top to bottom: Chief Albert Luthuli, Nobel Peace Prize winner and banned President of the African National Congress, and Robert F. Kennedy, Senator; Larry Shore, PhD, documentary film producer/director and professor of film & media at Hunter College

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Finding Monhagen Brook

Edward Helbig, Orange County Water Authority (OCWA) Education CoordinatorWednesday, November 12, 2014 at 7pm
Orange Hall Gallery (MDTN)

With maps and photos as visuals, Edward Helbig, Orange County Water Authority (OCWA) Education Coordinator, will present a lecture on Finding Monhagen Brook. The presentation is scheduled at 7pm on Wednesday, November 12, 2014 in Orange Hall Gallery, SUNY Orange.

For hundreds of residents and businesses of Middletown, the mention of Monhagen Brook brings back horrible memories of their properties being inundated by the floodwaters caused by Hurricane Irene in August 2011. Monhagen Brook found them.

Map of Monhagen Brook WatershedSo, why a lecture on a hidden brook? Monhagen Brook is under many of the streets of Middletown. Over the years, it has been polluted by sewage and debris which impacts not only the environs of Middletown but also the brook’s widespread watershed which is connected to other bodies of water in Orange County.

Edward Helbig will examine the history of the brook, how it came to be covered, and the importance of opening it. He will explain the process necessary to clean Map of Monhagen Brook Watershedit and make it vital once again, not only for health reasons but also the economic benefits an opened, visible Monhagen Brook can offer.  He will offer examples of other municipalities that have opened streams and brooks and turned them into focal points of parks and recreational areas which attract visitors and local people and that, in turn, help the economy.

This event is free and open to the public and is set in Orange Hall Gallery in order that attendees can view the Waterways and Wildlife exhibit. Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown. Engineers and architects will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU for lecture attendance.

In addition to being the education coordinator at the OCWA, Helbig is the principal teacher at the Birch School, an ecology-based alternative school where student work is self-directed, project-based, and collaborative. He holds BFA and MAT degrees.

Questions on this and other events may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and 845-341-4891.

Images (photos provided by Edward Helbig), top to bottom: Edward Helbig, Orange County Water Authority (OCWA) Education Coordinator; Maps of Monhagen Brook Watershed

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Contact Us:
Dorothy Szefc
Coordinator of Cultural Affairs
(845) 341-4891
cultural@sunyorange.edu

All Cultural Affairs Events are open to the public and all buildings are universally accessible.

NOTE: All artists' images on these pages are copyrighted and are used by kind permission of the artists. Please do not download, reproduce or use without permission.