March 2015 - Upcoming Events

Date Event
Type
Title Campus Building
2/9 - 3/25 Exhibit North East Watercolor Society Members 2015 Exhibition MDTN Orange Hall Gallery and Loft
2/11 - 3/25 Exhibit Scapes from New York MDTN Orange Hall Gallery Fringe
2/17 - 5/27 Exhibit Artists of Excellence ~ Works by Brenda Scott Harburger and Margaret Drake NBG Kaplan Hall, foyer of Mindy Ross Gallery
3/1,
3 p.m.
Concert The Romantics: Selections by Robert and Clara Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, Handel/Halvorsen MDTN Orange Hall Theatre
New Date: 4/13
10 a.m.

Master Class Working as Professional Classical Musicians on the International Scene MDTN Orange Hall, Room 23
3/2,
noon
Film Guantanamera NBG Tower Building, Tower Café
New Date:
4/7,
7 p.m.
Lecture Old Technology, New Technology: The Cathedral of Notre-Dame of Paris in the 21st Century MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum

3/5,
7 p.m.

Master Class The Journey from Class Clown to VP NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
3/6 - 5/21 Exhibit The Newburgh Paintings ~ Works by Martha Zola NBG Kaplan Hall,
Mindy Ross Gallery
3/7,
8 p.m.
Concert Randy Brecker Band MDTN Orange Hall Theatre
3/8,
3 p.m.
Concert Choral Sunday NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
3/9,
7:15 p.m.
Lecture The Science beneath the Surface MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum
3/10,
7:15 p.m.
Film Everything is Illuminated MDTN Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre
3/15,
2 p.m.
Theatre The Little Farm Show NBG Kaplan Hall, OCTC Great Room
3/18,
7 p.m.
Lecture Spectators of Life: The “Ashcan” Painters and the World They Knew MDTN Middletown Library, Gilman Center
3/30,
6 p.m.
Master Class Blogging and Online Presentation for Creative Endeavors: How to Market Yourself as a Working Artist MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum
3/31,
7 p.m.
Lecture John Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct MDTN Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Gerry Forum

North East Watercolor Society Members 2015 Exhibition

Goshen Trotter, watercolor by Janet Campbell;Monday, February 9, 2015 to Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Orange Hall Gallery and Loft (MDTN)

A regular feature of the Cultural Affairs winter calendar of events is the members’ art exhibit of the North East Watercolor Society. However, nothing is regular or ordinary about this show.  Each year the expectations of quality and subject are exceeded. And this year the number of participants is larger, too.

Blue Tutu, watercolor by Barbara SimonsonThe North East Watercolor Society 2015 Members’ Show has 60 artists displaying transparent and semi-transparent watercolor works. Both Orange Hall Gallery and Loft are filled with the 112 works of varying sizes and styles of still lifes, land and seascapes, portraits, genre paintings, and semi-abstracts. The exhibit timeframe is February 9 through March 25, 2015.

An added feature this year is the solo watercolor exhibit on the Orange Hall Gallery Fringe wall by Dorrie Rifkin who is the demonstrator at the reception on Saturday, February 14. Entitled “Paint the Town Red (or Raspberry or Rose or Ruby): Compose, Draw, and Paint,” the demonstration runs from 2:30 till 3:35pm. Rifkin has 30 years of experience as an award-winning art director. She teaches watercolors in New Jersey and is increasingly in demand nationally to conduct her watercolor workshop series. Her paintings have won prizes in many international and national juried shows.  In addition, she is a signature member of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, Pennsylvania Watercolor Society, Transparent Watercolor Society of America, and the North East Watercolor Society. The cover art for Grand Central Station’s Connections, celebrating the terminal’s winter 2011 centennial, was her iconic painting of its interior.

Cindy’s Heron, watercolor by Lorraine RimmelinTo add to the festive arts experience at the reception, jazz, classical, and contemporary show tunes will be played from 1 to 2:30pm by the Piano-Flute Duo of Albany -- pianist Geoff Hamburg and flutist/saxophonist Tom DeCelle. The reception is scheduled from 1 to 4:15pm with the awards ceremony at the end.

The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. Gallery Hours are 9am to 8pm Monday through Thursday, and 9am to 6pm on Friday; also, Friday, February 13, 9am-10pm, Sunday, March 1, 2-4:30pm, and Saturday, March 7, 7-10pm. March 23-25 hours are 9am-6pm.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY on the campus of Orange County Community College. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu

Images, top to bottom: Goshen Trotter, watercolor by Janet Campbell; Blue Tutu, watercolor by Barbara Simonson; Cindy’s Heron, watercolor by Lorraine Rimmelin

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Scapes from New York

Dorrie Rifkin, watercoloristWednesday, February 11, 2015 to Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Orange Hall Gallery Fringe (MDTN)

Watercolorist Dorrie Rifkin will show 30 watercolor paintings depicting scenes of New York City in her solo exhibit, Scapes from New York, from February 11-March 25, 2015 in Orange Hall Gallery Fringe, a 40-foot wall in the gallery.

Her exhibit complements the North East Watercolor Society Members 2015 Exhibition (February 9-March 25) in Orange Hall Gallery and Loft.  During the reception for the two shows on Saturday, February 14, she will present a watercolor demonstration titled, “Paint the Town Red (or Raspberry or Rose or Ruby): Compose, Draw, and Paint” from 2:30 to 3:30pm. Having a wall of her paintings on display in the Fringe, offers viewers a more in depth perspective of Rifkin’s work, both concept and technique. Her style is loose and transparent. Her paintings give a peek into her life as each tells a personal story.

Da Subway, watercolor by Dorrie RifkinRifkin’s passion for painting New York City is evident in her artwork.  “I’m lucky to live close to New York City; I spend a lot of time there,” says Rifkin, an Englewood, NJ, resident.  “When I go to the city I usually bring a camera or sketchbook.  Running out of things to paint would mean that I am not doing much of anything with my life.”

In addition to being a watercolor painter, Dorrie Rifkin has 30 years of experience as an award-winning art director, which fuels her love of typography. Rifkin teaches watercolors in New Jersey and is increasingly in demand nationally to conduct her watercolor workshop series.

Lincoln Center, watercolor by Dorrie RifkinHer paintings have won prizes in many international and national juried shows.  In addition, she is a signature member of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, Pennsylvania Watercolor Society, Transparent Watercolor Society of America, and the North East Watercolor Society.  Rifkin’s work has been selected for both Splash 14: Light and Color and Splash 15: Creative Solutions (North Light Books).  In Watercolor Artist magazine’s December 2010 edition, she was profiled in the “Ones to Watch” feature.

Rifkin’s paintings are in several private collections in the United States and Europe.  Her NYC/NJ-themed prints adorned sets and locations on NBC’s Prime Suspect TV series (2011) and Fox’s Brooklyn Nine - Nine series (2013).  The cover art for Grand Central Station’s Connections, celebrating the terminal’s winter 2011 centennial, was her iconic painting of its interior.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown on the campus of SUNY Orange.  Gallery hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Friday 9am to 6pm; as well as on Friday, February 13,  9am-10pm; Saturdays, February 14, 1-4:15pm; and March 7,  7-10pm.  March 23-25 the gallery closes at 6pm. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

If you have any questions, you may contact Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Dorrie Rifkin, watercolorist; Da Subway, watercolor by Dorrie Rifkin; Lincoln Center, watercolor by Dorrie Rifkin

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Artists of Excellence ~ Works by Brenda Scott Harburger and Margaret Drake

La Femme, bronze by Brenda Scott HarburgerTuesday, February 17, 2014 to Saturday, May 30, 2015
The Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Highlighting artists of Newburgh, the Artists of Excellence exhibit spotlights the exquisite works of sculptors Brenda Scott Harburger and Margaret Drake, both Newburgh residents. Their sculptures, ranging from abstraction to realism, are on view in the vitrine glass cases in the Foyer of the Mindy Ross Gallery. The Artists of Excellence exhibit series features distinguished regional artists and gives both the college community and the community-at-large the opportunity of viewing three dimensional pieces in various media, this time produced by artists who happen to live in Newburgh. The exhibit will extend from February 17 to May 30, 2015.

Kipling as a Young Cat, oil clay by Brenda Scott HarburgerBrenda Scott Harburger is exhibiting four of her sculptures, two bronzes, one terra-cotta, and one made of oil-clay. The terra cotta piece is quite realistic, but the rest are extremely stylized, with simplified forms that have great presence.

Expressing her talent in very early childhood and through her school years, Harburger fine-tuned her studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder where she received a BFA. After a successful career as a new product marketing executive and an art director at her own advertising agency, Harburger decided to put her energy into the creation of fine art. In the spring of 2012, she traveled with the Warwick Atelier to paint en plein air in Ireland. She showed her Colorado award-winning watercolor, A Wash with Sadness, at Orange Hall Gallery the following autumn, and was the “Emerging Artist” at the Wallkill River School in March 2013, showing a dozen pieces. In the fall of 2013, she participated in On & Off the Wall ~ Sculpture: Art in 3 Dimensions at Orange Hall Gallery and recently, in exhibits at the New Windsor Gallery. Currently, she studies with William Noonan.

Reflections, patinated bronze by Margaret DrakeMargaret Drake is showing five pieces, three cast in bronze and two in plaster. The works are highly realistic, rich in detail, but natural. Over the years, she has exhibited her pieces in New York City and Connecticut as well as local venues including SUNY Orange, Middletown, Mt. St. Mary College, Newburgh Free Library, and others. Drake is a native of nearby Ulster County. Acting on the encouragement of a friend and colleague, Dolly Kearney, she began her study of sculpture with Jean Carlson in Cornwall. Later, she studied with Tom Devaney at both his Newburgh and Connecticut studios. Most recently, she has been working with Najim Chechen at Fine Art Studios in Otisville.

Kaplan Hall on the SUNY Orange Newburgh campus is located on the corner of Grand and First Streets. The exhibit can be viewed when the college is open Monday through Friday and during special events such as performances in the OCTC Great Room and Last Saturdays.

The exhibit is free and open to the public. For more information, e-mail cultural@sunyorange.edu or call (845) 341-9386.

Images, top to bottom: La Femme, bronze by Brenda Scott Harburger; Kipling as a Young Cat, oil clay by Brenda Scott Harburger; Reflections, patinated bronze by Margaret Drake

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The Romantics: Selections by Robert and Clara Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, Handel/Halvorsen

Sunday, March 1, 2015 at 3pm
Orange Hall Theatre (MDTN)

Trio+: Yosuke Kawasaki, violinist; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Vadim Serebryani, pianoMarch is Women’s History Month. To open this special month and to celebrate International Women’s Day, Trio+ will be presenting a concert of classical selections and original poetry on the stage of Orange Hall Theatre. Entitled, The Romantics: Selections by Robert and Clara Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, Handel/Halvorsen, the performance will take place on Sunday, March 1, 2015 at 3pm.

Interestingly, Trio+ is an ensemble of three men: Yosuke Kawasaki, violinist; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Vadim Serebryany, piano. However, joining them is poet J. Mae Barizo, a classically trained musician who is a published and prize-winning poet, writer, and cultural critic. Interspersed within the concert, she will read her original poems each with a connection to one of the musical selections.

J. Mae Barizo, poet, writer, and cultural criticClassical music enthusiasts who have attended concerts by the American String Quartet may recognize the wonderfully talented cellist, Wolfram Koessel, who plays in both groups. Trio+ is a close-knit group as Yosuke Kawasaki and Vadim Serebryany are friends of Koessel and he is married to J. Mae Barizo. They perform often together.

They promise to “take you on an expedition through the ardor and drama of Robert and Clara Schumann and their contemporaries,” according to Koessel. The program includes

G.F. Handel/Johann Halvorson:  Passacaglia for Violin and Cello;

Clara Schumann: 3 Romances for violin and piano;

Robert Schumann: Folk tone pieces for cello and piano;

Johannes Brahms: Scherzo from the F.A.E sonata for violin and piano;

Franz Schubert: Piano trio No. 2 in E flat major, D. 929

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda & Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

Tickets will be on sale at the Orange Hall box office starting at 2pm the afternoon of the performance, plus online anytime at www.sunyorange.edu/arts_comm/ticketing.shtml

Admission is $15 adults; $10 senior citizens, SUNY Orange alumni, faculty, staff; and free for all students from any educational institution.

Questions may be addressed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Trio+: Yosuke Kawasaki, violinist; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Vadim Serebryany, piano; J. Mae Barizo, poet, writer, and cultural critic

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Working as Professional Classical Musicians on the International Scene

Rescheduled to
Monday, April 13, 2015 from 10-11:30am
Orange Hall, Room 23 (MDTN)

The music master class originally scheduled for Monday, March 2, 2015 will be presented from 10-11:30 am on Monday, April 13 in Orange Hall room 23. The postponement was caused by inclement weather. The new date is particularly pertinent to the title Working as Professional Classical Musicians on the International Scene, as the ensemble Trio+ will have just returned from a four-concert tour in Japan. During the master class, which is free and open to the public, the musicians will discuss classical music, how they started, how they formed their trio, and making it on the international music scene.

Trio+: Yosuke Kawasaki, violinist; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Vadim Serebryani, pianoThe musicians of Trio+ are friends Yosuke Kawasaki, violin; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Vadim Serebryany, piano. They perform creative and collaborative concerts throughout Japan, the United States, and Canada.

Yosuke Kawasaki is the Concertmaster of the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Canada, Principle Guest Concertmaster of the Century Orchestra Osaka, as well as a member of Mito Chamber Orchestra and Saito Kinen Orchestra. He graduated from The Juilliard School in 1998 under the tutorship of Dorothy DeLay, Hyo Kang, Felix Galimir and Joel Smirnoff.

Since his critically acclaimed Carnegie Hall debut, cellist Wolfram Koessel has embarked on a diverse career as a soloist, recitalist and chamber musician, performing internationally in the world’s most distinguished concert halls. In 2006, Koessel joined the American String Quartet. He is also on the cello and chamber music faculty at the Manhattan School of Music and in residence at the Aspen Music Festival and the Great Wall Academy in China.

Vadim Serebryany received his Associateship Diploma of the Royal Conservatory in Toronto at the age of 16, scoring First Class Honors with Distinction. He went on to New York's Julliard School, where he earned both Bachelor's and Master's degrees. He continued his studies at Yale University, where he completed his doctoral work, and subsequently held a one-year teaching appointment. He is presently an associate professor of music at Huntingdon College.

Come and enjoy learning from these young, creative classical musicians who will also play some favorite selections. They will gladly answer questions in this relaxed atmosphere upfront and personal.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda & Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

This event is a presentation of Cultural Affairs to which questions may be directed: (845)341-4891, cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Image: Trio+: Yosuke Kawasaki, violinist; Wolfram Koessel, cello; Vadim Serebryany, piano

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Guantanamera

Monday, March 2, 2015 at noon
Tower Building Café (NBG)

The film Guantanamera will be screened in Spanish with English subtitles at SUNY Orange at 12 o’clock noon on Monday, March 2, 2015 in the Tower Café. The Café is located on the lowest level of the Tower Building located at One Washington Center at the corner of Broadway and Colden Street, Newburgh. Admission is free and open to the public.

Image from GauntanameraGuantanamera is a comedy that portrays life in Cuba in the 1990s.  In light of the recent start of restoration of diplomatic relations between the US and Cuba, this film is especially timely, bringing to light aspects of the Cuba that have existed during some of the 50+ years of embargo and isolation.  Global Studies Professor Dr. Jean Carlos Cowan will give an introduction that includes information about the movie as well as updates on the progress of US-Cuban relations. 

Besides being a comedy, the film is noted for depicting life in Cuba during the "Special Period" of the 1990s, a time of relative poverty for Cuba following the termination of Soviet aid to the country.  Released in 1994, the film was written and directed by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea and Juan Carlos Tabío, with cinematography by Hans Burman, and music by José Nieto.  It stars Carlos Cruz (Adolfo), Mirtha Ibarra (Georgina), Raul Eguren (Candido), Jorge Perugorria (Mariano) and Suset Perez Malberti (Iku). Guantanamera has the structure of a folk song, with its episodes strung together by fragments of the Pete Seeger-Hector Angulo folk hit from which the movie takes its title. For the movie, the song has been refitted with new lyrics that advance the story.

Roger Ebert, the late Chicago Sun-Times film critic, stated about the film: “Cuba may languish under a bankrupt and dour political system, but it is, after all a Caribbean island--filled with life, color and invention. Guantanamera celebrates Cuban paradoxes in a cheeky little comedy about two romances that endure through the years…This is the last film by Tomas Gutierrez Alea, the sly satirist who insisted he was a loyal Cuban even while making comedies indicating there was a great deal in his native land that he found overripe for improvement…In the sides and backgrounds of his shots, Alea has made an unwitting (or perhaps a very witting) documentary.”

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845) 341-9386 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Image from Gauntanamera

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Old Technology, New Technology: The Cathedral of Notre-Dame of Paris in the 21st Century

Andrew Tallon, PhD, Vassar professor (photo by Craig Stapert)Rescheduled to
Tuesday, April 7, 2015 at 7pm
Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010, Rowley Center for Science & Engineering (MDTN)

Andrew Tallon, PhD is fascinated by architecture. He is an expert on Gothic structures but studies them through 21st century electronic tools. On Tuesday, April 7, 2015, he will share his findings and explain his method in a lecture entitled Old Technology, New Technology: The Cathedral of Notre-Dame of Paris in the 21st Century. This presentation, which is free and open to the public, was originally scheduled on March 3 but was postponed because of a snowstorm. The start time is 7 pm and the venue is the Rowley Center for Science & Engineering, Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010. Engineers and architects will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU for lecture attendance. Registration is not necessary.

Tallon will compare architectural structure, medieval acoustics, the culture of building restoration in 19th century France, and the virtual representation of architectural space through 3D laser imaging and modeling. Construction of the Cathedral began in 1160 and with several revisions along the way was finally completed in 1345.

Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris, France laser scanAndrew Tallon teaches medieval art and architecture at Vassar College. He has published a number of articles on Gothic architecture and is in the process of writing a book entitled The Structure of Gothic. A book on the cathedral of Paris, co-authored with Dany Sandron, was published in May 2013. He has researched the architecture of the cathedral of Bourges using laser scanning. His research is featured in an Emmy-nominated PBS/Nova special entitled Building the Great Cathedrals, which first aired nationally in October 2010; a feature-length documentary entitled Les cathédrales dévoilées, produced by Arte, which first aired on public television in Europe in April 2011 and in a recent edition of Des racines et des ailes on the television channel France 3.

He received a five-year grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation for a web-based project entitled “Mapping Gothic France” and a grant for research from the Samuel Kress Foundation. He was the recipient of a 2010 Horizon Interactive Award. In 2012, he curated an exhibition entitled Space, Time, and Narrative at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College. Tallon is one of the Directors of the International Center of Medieval Art, a world-wide organization based at The Cloisters.

Andrew Tallon holds a B.A. with highest honors from Princeton University, an M.A. from the University of Paris IV at the Sorbonne, and a Ph.D. with distinction from Columbia University.

The Gerry Forum of the Rowley Center for Science and Engineering is located on the ground floor and can be accessed via the parking area and entrance near the corner of East Conkling and Wawayanda Avenues, Middletown, NY.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu

Images, top to bottom: Andrew Tallon, PhD, Vassar professor (photo by Craig Stapert); Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris, France laser scan

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The Journey from Class Clown to VP

Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 7pm
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Rick Zolzer was a “cut-up” in school. He was always “getting thrown out of class.” But behind that “class clown” was a determined kid who wanted to make it in sports. Despite playing baseball in high school and college, he realized that he wasn’t going to become a professional baseball player. (Presently, less than 1% of college players make it to the major leagues.) Consequently, he decided to work within sports, but in a different capacity from player. He knew he had the personality to work in the public eye or ear. He found his vocation, as such, from within.

Rick Zolzer, vice-president of Hudson Valley RenegadesOn Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 7pm, he will give a master class in communications entitled, The Journey from Class Clown to VP. During the class he will discuss his method of assessing and reshaping and thereby attaining his goals. He will enumerate the many positions he has held and how his communications skills opened many doors for him.

The master class will take place in the Orange County Trust Company Great Room in Kaplan Hall. The session is free and open to the public.

Many minor league baseball fans will recognize Zolzer as being the entertaining announcer at the Hudson Valley Renegades games. He has been with the HV Renegades for 18 years and is now the vice-president. During his time with the baseball club, he was in charge of the Renegades’ special events department. When he had that position, he was responsible for having raised enough money to give away over $500,000 to local kids and family initiatives. Along the way, he has been a radio sports broadcaster at WPDH for 20 years and WRWD for 2 years. In addition, he was the New Jersey Nets public address (PA) announcer for 3 years and announced the National Basketball Association (NBA) finals 2 years in a row. He also was the Army Football PA announcer for 7 years. To keep his sports skills up, he coached baseball, football, and basketball at Our Lady of Lourdes High School in Poughkeepsie for 6 years and football at Marist College for 3 years. Because he enjoys entertaining people, he figured he could create a company that would afford him the opportunity to perform, entertain, and earn a salary. Zolz Entertainment, a DJ Company, was launched 30 years ago and continues to be a strong business in that niche industry.

Kaplan Hall stands at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh. Entry to the garage where there is free, secure parking is located on the First Street side.

For further information, e-mail cultural@sunyorange.edu or call 845-341-9386/4891.

Image (Photo by David Spagnolo): Rick Zolzer, vice-president of Hudson Valley Renegades

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The Newburgh Paintings ~ Works by Martha Zola

Friday, March 6, 2015 to Thursday, May 21, 2015
Mindy Ross Gallery, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Martha Zola, PhD, artistMartha Zola’s new series of paintings is on view in the Mindy Ross Gallery in Kaplan Hall March 6 through May 21, 2015. The show demonstrates, as explained by Zola “ordinary, transcendental, beautiful life lived in Newburgh every day.” A“detour from [her] recent abstractions” The Newburgh Paintings exhibit focuses on figurative painting of familiar people, places,and activities of the city. Her “painterly style, love of color, brushwork, texture, and regard for the alchemy that life events have on perception” are present in these vivid, bold paintings in her primary medium, acrylic. Her paintings speak about the meaningfulness, meditative aspects of ordinary life.

An opening reception will be held Friday, March 6, 2015 from 5 to 7pm. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 9am to 4pm, as well as on Sundays, March 8 from 2 to 5pm and March 15 from 1 to 4:30pm, and for Newburgh Last Saturdays on April 25 from 5 to 8pm. The gallery is closed during spring break from March 21-29.

Beacon Dog and Plant, acrylic on canvas by Martha ZolaOver the years, solo exhibits of Zola’s works have been staged at the Sylvia White Gallery in New York’s Soho district, the Columbia University Medical Library in Manhattan, and previously at the Mindy Ross Gallery, as well as at other venues. She has received prestigious awards from New York University, the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, NY, and IBM.

Broadway and Dubois, acrylic on canvas by Martha ZolaZola has had a deep personal immersion in the arts, as a painter, teacher, and scholar. She currently teaches courses on the arts and creativity in business and the military at The Eisenhower Leadership Center. She has taught classes in art history, studio art, art appreciation, and drawing at Suffolk County Community College, Orange County Community College, and in other public and private school settings. She has published and consulted on giftedness in art. Zola earned her PhD in Educational Research at Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY, her MS in education from Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, NY, and her BS in Art Education at New York University.

On Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 6pm, Zola will give a master class entitled, “Modern Art: Why Does It Look Like That?” in the Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall. She will give background on modern art and then guide participants in creating works of their own. Materials will be provided.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of Grand and First Streets, Newburgh, NY. Free and secure parking is available in the Kaplan Hall garage accessible from First Street.

The exhibit, reception, and master class are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Cultural Affairs at cultural@sunyorange.edu or (845) 341-9386.

Images, top to bottom: Martha Zola, PhD, artist; Beacon Dog and Plant, acrylic on canvas by Martha Zola; Broadway and Dubois, acrylic on canvas by Martha Zola

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Randy Brecker Band

Saturday, March 7, 2015 at 8pm
Orange Hall Theatre (MDTN)

Randy Brecker, trumpet and flugelhorn playerJazz great, Randy Brecker brings his trumpet and flugelhorn along with his band to play high energy harmonic and melodic jazz with sleek, imaginative and cliché-free improvising to Orange Hall Theatre. Come on Saturday, March 7, 2015 for the 8pm concert of acoustic jazz with the Randy Brecker Band.

Brecker is excited to bring this group together because as he explains, “this is a group that I toured a lot with before the Brecker Brothers Band reunion stuff started a couple of years ago...so this'll be a reunion, too, of sorts!” Ada Rovatti who brought her band to Orange Hall Theatre three weeks ago, will be coming with her tenor and soprano saxes. Jill McCarron will be playing the nine-foot Steinway piano. Steve LaSpina is bringing his standing bass. And Steve Johns on drums rounds out the quintet.

Grammy-award winner Brecker has been shaping the sound of Jazz, R&B and Rock for more than two decades. His trumpet and flugelhorn performances have added sparkle and verve to a wide range of works. He and his band will dazzle the Orange Hall Theatre stage and be the highlight of the weekend.

Orange Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY on the campus of Orange County Community College. The box office opens at 7pm the evening of the concert. Tickets are also available online anytime at www.sunyorange.edu/arts_comm/ticketing.shtml.

Admission is $15 adults; $10 senior citizens, faculty, staff, alumni; and free for all students.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs: (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Image (Photo by John Abbott): Randy Brecker, trumpet and flugelhorn player

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Choral Sunday

Sunday, March 8, 2015 at 3pm
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

Newburgh is a city filled with the gift of the voice through singing, especially on Sunday. Congregations of churches raise their voices in praise.

So, to gather three diverse choirs to participate in a performance is indeed a special occasion.

Come to Kaplan Hall at SUNY Orange for Choral Sunday, a glorious afternoon of Gospel Music. This event will begin at 3pm on Sunday, March 8, 2015 in the OCTC Great Room, and a reception with refreshments will follow the program.

The Ebenezer Baptist Church Sanctuary Choir is a fairly large group numbering 25 voices plus drummer and pianist.

Bishop Joseph P. Thompson Anthem Choir of the AME Zion Church is a small ensemble of three women and two men.

New Beginners Church of Christ Youth Choir is a group of young people that includes a praise dance in the repertoire.

The three choirs, each with its own timbre, will give their versions of favorite hymns and sacred songs while uplifting the audience and fellow choir members through the beauty of voice.

Hallelujah!

General admission to this varied program is $5 at the door and all students are free. Box office opens at 2pm.

Kaplan Hall is located at the corner of First and Grand Streets, Newburgh. Free and secure parking is available in the Kaplan Hall garage accessible from First Street. Questions may be directed to cultural@sunyorange.edu and (845) 341-4891.

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The Science beneath the Surface

Monday, March 9, 2015 at 7:15pm
Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010, Rowley Center for Science & Engineering (MDTN)

Warren Allmon, PhDDr. Warren D. Allmon, is coming from Ithaca on Monday, March 9 at 7:15pm to deliver another of his interesting and educational lectures.

Allmon is the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution and its Museum of the Earth. He has spoken at SUNY Orange several times on various topics from mastodons to Darwin. This time the topic is a hot topic, hydrofracking. However, Allmon will not be presenting as pro or con. He will be “reviewing the major science and technology issues around this complex topic, offering impartial, evidence-based, thought-provoking information as based on the current state of what science 'knows' through a reasonable consensus,” he explains. The talk is an outgrowth of a new book written by him and two of his museum and PRI colleagues, Dr. Robert M. Ross and Dr. Don Duggan-Haas. Consequently the title of the lecture is the same as the book—The Science Beneath the Surface, A Very Short Guide to the Marcellus Shale.

Book: The Science beneath the Surface, A Very Short Guide to the Marcellus Shale, by Don Duggan-Haas, Robert M. Ross, and Warren D. Allmon, Book cover image: outcrop of the Marcellus Shale at its “type locality” (the first place that it was described in scientific literature, and for which it is named) in Marcellus, New York (Photo by Ben Aronson, courtesy of Linda Ivany)“Hydrofracking or hydraulic fracturing is an unconventional method used to extract natural gas from shale deposits, such as the Marcellus Shale. Concerns about how widespread use of the practice will affect the natural environment, especially freshwaters at the local level and climate at the global level, have thrust geology into the public view in a way seldom otherwise experienced.” The Marcellus Shale--a vast rock formation that holds a huge reservoir of natural gas--is at the center of one of the most controversial natural resources issues of our time. This formation borders areas of Orange County. Marcellus Shale underlies Ithaca and its environs. Therefore, the Museum of the Earth and the Paleontological Research Institution have reason in researching it for the effects of hydrofracking as one of the goals is to outreach to the general public and to educate and “to improve science literacy, especially about the Earth.”

Marcellus Shale is a unit of marine sedimentary rock. The fossil record in some layers provides important paleontological insights. The PRI houses one of the largest fossil collections in North America with a holding of over 2 million fossils and shells, and a 50,000 volume research library.

Graph of Marcellus Shale Base Depth (Source: Marcellus Outreach Center of Penn State)In 2004, Allmon received the American Geological Institute Award for Outstanding Contribution of Public Understanding of Geosciences. He constantly seeks new ways of outreaching directly and through his staff who he inspires. Allmon received an A.B. in Earth Sciences from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Harvard University. In addition to his work at PRI and the museum, he is the Hunter R. Rawlings III Professor of Paleontology in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University He also continues his research in his expertise on macroevolution and evolutionary paleoecology, especially the environmental and ecological context of evolutionary change, particularly in Cenozoic mollusks, and especially the gastropod family Turritellidae, which are nearly ubiquitous in the marine fossil record over the past 130 million years, and also widely distributed in modern oceans.

Come and learn from this energetic, engaging speaker. The program, which is free and open to the public, will take place at the Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, room 010 of the Rowley Center for Science and Engineering. RCSE is on Wawayanda Avenue, Middletown, and accessed through the parking lot across East Conkling Avenue from the parking garage where free parking is available.

Engineers and architects will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU for lecture attendance.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Warren Allmon, PhD; Book: The Science beneath the Surface, A Very Short Guide to the Marcellus Shale, Book cover image: outcrop of the Marcellus Shale at its “type locality” (the first place that it was described in scientific literature, and for which it is named) in Marcellus, New York (Photo by Ben Aronson, courtesy of Linda Ivany); Graph of Marcellus Shale Base Depth (Source: Marcellus Outreach Center of Penn State)

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Everything is Illuminated

Everything is Illuminated movie posterTuesday, March 10, 2015 at 7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre (MDTN)

In Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 7:15pm, a film screening of Everything is Illuminated will take place as the second in a series of three films being screened as a collaborative effort of Cultural Affairs and the English Department.

The 2005 biographical film, based on a novel by Jonathan Safran Foer, presents the journey of the young American Jew, Jonathan Safran Foer (Elijah Wood), to the Ukraine to find the woman, Augustine, who saved his Jewish grandfather during the Holocaust in a small Ukrainian village named Trachimbrod that was obliterated when the Nazis destroyed Eastern European shtetls. His search is guided by a gruff elderly man (Boris Leskin), his deranged Border collie, and his eccentric grandson Alex (Eugene Hutz) despite their questionable competence. The film marks Liev Schreiber’s debut as both a director and screenwriter.

Everything is Illuminated won Best Screenplay at the São Paulo International Film Festival, the Biografilm Award and Laterna Magica Prize at the Venice Film Festival, and the Audience Award and FIPRESCI Prize at the Bratislava International Film Festival.

A post-screening discussion will be led by English Professors Anne Sandor and Andrea Laurencell Sheridan. This event is free and open to the public. The film screening series concludes with Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on Thursday, April 2, 2015 at 6:15pm also in Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre.

SUNY Orange’s Harriman Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. Nearby free parking is available in the parking garage on East Conkling Avenue and lots next to Orange Hall and the Shepard Center.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Image: Everything is Illuminated movie poster

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The Little Farm Show

Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 2pm
Orange County Trust Company Great Room, Kaplan Hall (NBG)

The Little Farm Show is coming to Newburgh, NY at SUNY Orange’s Kaplan Hall in the Orange County Trust Company Great Room on Sunday, March 15 2015 at 2pm. The performance is an original play designed for family entertainment created by the North American Cultural Laboratory’s (NACL) artistic director Tannis Kowalchuk and writer-performer Brett Keyser.

Brett Keyser and Tannis Kowalchuk, creators and performersA fun-filled show with lots of comedy and laughs, this is wonderful children’s theatre with education as its basis. Using shadow-puppet dinosaurs, a clothesline, flamboyant hats, hip-hop beats, banners, songs, and instruments—including guitar, kazoo, accordion, and spoons—Kowalchuk and Keyser present a brief history of the universe and farming in high-spirited fashion. With its original lyrics about farming, food, and the environment set to familiar tunes, the production gives audiences a whirlwind tour of “The Greatest Show on Dirt!” and poses the question, “Where does your Food come from?”

The Little Farm Show bannerNACL is artist-run, and defines itself as a laboratory theatre. In tandem with its theatre-creation work, the company has developed a performer training technique.The company’s repertory of 16 original theatre pieces has toured across Canada, the USA, and to England, Italy, Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania, and Mexico. Head-quartered in Highland Lake, NY, NACL offers Deep Space, a performance residency program for artists and groups who make devised, original, or ensemble performance. Kowalchuk and Brad Krumholz co-founded the NACL Theatre.

Kowalchuk is a graduate of the University of Winnipeg theatre department and was a core member of Primus Theatre, a prominent experimental theatre troupe based in Canada from 1990-97. Along with her husband Greg Swartz, she runs Willow Wisp Organic Farm, Abrahamsville, PA. Keyser studied at Winnipeg's Primus Theatre, Odin Teatret in Denmark, and the San Francisco School of Circus Arts. He has a degree in Folklore and Folklife Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. Keyser is also the proprietor of Nightjar Apothecary, designing and performing original, science-themed theatrical works and installations for museums, theatres, and public thoroughfares.

General seating tickets will be available at the box office only, starting at 1pm the afternoon of the performance. Admission is $5 for children/students, adults, senior citizens, faculty, staff, alumni; SUNY Orange credit students with ID will be admitted free. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs: (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Brett Keyser and Tannis Kowalchuk, creators and performers; The Little Farm Show banner

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Spectators of Life: The “Ashcan” Painters and the World They Knew

Dr. Valerie Ann Leeds, curatorial consultantWednesday, March 18, 2015 at 7pm
Gilman Center, Library Room 130 (MDTN)

The American artists group identified as the “Ashcan” painters is the topic of discussion by Curatorial Consultant Dr. Valerie Ann Leeds on Wednesday, March 18, 2015. The lecture will begin at 7pm in the Gilman Center for International Education, Room 130 in the Library. Entitled Spectators of Life: The “Ashcan” Painters and the World They Knew, this event is free and open to the public.

An ash can is a metal receptacle for refuse, according to Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary. Years ago, some of these containers were used to burn trash with ashes as the remains. The shades of ashes may be the only resemblance to the works of art produced by these painters, since they used a subdued palette. During the talk, Dr. Leeds promises to debunk the Ashcan label and, thereby explain why it is a misnomer.

57th Street, oil on canvas by Robert HenriIn addition, Leeds will give an overview of the works of Fiske Boyd at the mini-gallery just outside the Gilman Center where a permanent exhibit of Boyd's works is on view. She will discuss how his artworks relate and differ from the artworks of the Ashcan Painters.

Snow in New York, oil on canvas by Robert HenriThe Ashcan School was a group of American urban realist painters active from 1908 until approximately World War I. It included five “members of The Eight—Glackens, Henri, Luks, Shinn, and Sloan—who were united, as such, by their rejection of officially approved styles and subject matter”* of the National Academy. They also “felt a desire to paint American life and to be recognized as specifically American painters. “Other artists associated with the Ashcan school include Bellows, Coleman, Davies, Du bois, Hopper, and Maurer. Inspired by their leader, Henri, they followed the socially oriented tradition of Goya and Daumier and were influenced by the technique of Manet, painting with broad, rapid, brush-strokes.”* These outdoor cityscapes depicted, in many cases, narrow streets lit by dim gas lamps, which lent to the dark, gray, brown look of the works. However, the paintings of the Ashcan School were interesting as they were concerned with the ordinary life of the common people, “slum dwellers, ethnic groups, and outcasts. Although identified as reformers and radicals,”* the Ashcan realists “avoided serious issues in their work, concentrating on the picturesqueness of their subject”*.---*Dictionary of Art & Artists, Collins Reference

Valerie Ann Leeds holds a BA in Art History and a minor in English Literature from the University of Rochester, an MA in Art History, 19th Century European Art; and a minor in Museology from Syracuse University, and a PhD in Art History, American Art and Architecture from CUNY Graduate Center. She is listed in Who’s Who in American Art and is a member of the Association of Art Editors and Association of Historians of American Art. She has been awarded several residency fellowships and is a sought after speaker on many art subjects.

The Gilman Center in the Library is located at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue, Middletown, NY. Free parking can be found in the lots behind the Shepard Center on South Street and the parking garage on East Conkling Avenue. Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Images, top to bottom: Dr. Valerie Ann Leeds, curatorial consultant; 57th Street, oil on canvas by Robert Henri; Snow in New York, oil on canvas by Robert Henri

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Blogging and Online Presentation for Creative Endeavors: How to Market Yourself as a Working Artist

Samantha Seeley, recipe developer and bloggerMonday, March 30, 2015 from 6 to 7:30pm
Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010, Rowley Center for Science & Engineering (MDTN)

Social media, blogging, new media…to some people, it is blah, blah, blah. To others, the options in the tech scene are overwhelming. To the enterprising, the new media landscape presents opportunities in business and careers built through the efficient, creative, and sometimes adventurous use of social media, blogging, and new media.

On March 30, 2015, Samantha Seeley is giving a master class from 6 to 7:30pm on utilizing the new media as tools to success, Blogging and Online Presentation for Creative Endeavors: How to Market Yourself as a Working Artist.

Salad, photo by Samantha SeeleyWhile she is not old in years, Seeley is experienced beyond her years, making social media, blogging, and other new media 2.0 work for her in creating and sustaining small businesses.

She asks, “Are you interested in starting a blog for your brand or business?”

“Do you want to promote your Etsy store?”

“Do you have a talent you would like to showcase?”

During the class, she will show how to “present yourself digitally in a professional way and how to be seen in the crowd.” Q & A will provide explanations to individual’s questions and concerns.

Raspberries, photo by Samantha SeeleyIf you are curious; if you want to gain insight into 21st century technology; or if you need to get some ideas for using new media, social media, blogging; come to the presentation in the Rowley Center for Science and Engineering, Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, room 010, and be inspired.

Samantha Seeley is a multi-tasker. She is a recipe developer and blogger. Her food blog "Sweet Remedy" is an account of her food-centered life filled with sweet and savory recipes. In June of 2013 she was a speaker at the BlogHer Food conference on a panel titled Pro Food Photography on the Fly. She covers restaurant week in the Hudson Valley and has been published in a variety of publications, most notably The Valley Table magazine. Seeley is a SUNY Orange graduate and currently is a student pursing her BA in Multimedia Production.

RCSE is located on Wawayanda Avenue with entrance through the parking area at the corner of East Conkling Avenue, Middletown, NY. Free parking is available in the parking garage on East Conkling Avenue.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs: (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Samantha Seeley, recipe developer and blogger; Salad, photo by Samantha Seeley; Raspberries, photo by Samantha Seeley

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John Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct

Tuesday, March 31, 2015 at 7pm
Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, Room 010, Rowley Center for Science & Engineering (MDTN)

The Upper Delaware Scenic Byway, New York State Route 97, offers breath-taking views of the river and the surrounding area, the twisting turns of the famous Hawk’s Nest, and historical and recreational areas along the way. One of those historical sites was the site of the Battle of Minisink Ford in 1779 and 70 years later in 1849 the Hamlet of Minisink Ford became the eastern end of the Delaware Aqueduct. The aqueduct was one of four built by John Roebling who twenty years later saw the start of his design of the Brooklyn Bridge. The aqueducts, Delaware, Lackawaxen, Neversink, and High Falls, as well as the renowned bridge had one major component in common: a revolutionary suspension design incorporating iron-wire cables.

Susie Kaspar, Park Ranger with the National Park Service at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational RiverOn Tuesday, March 31, 2015, Susie Kaspar will explain in a lecture, the importance of the construction of the aqueduct bridge over the Delaware and how it helped shape the industrial and economic history of the region. Her talk, John Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct, will describe how the Delaware Aqueduct was a key component in the more efficient transporting of northeastern Pennsylvania anthracite coal on the Delaware and Hudson Canal to Kingston, NY where it was transferred to boats to travel down the Hudson River to New York City. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will be held at 7pm in the Sandra and Alan Gerry Forum, room 010 of the Rowley Center for Science and Engineering.

Historic John Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct in OperationToday, Roebling’s Delaware Aqueduct, also known as the Roebling Bridge, stands as the oldest existing wire suspension bridge in the United States. Roebling’s use of stiffened wire rope revolutionized the bridge industry and has helped the Delaware Aqueduct stand the test of time. Designated a National Civil Engineering Landmark in 1972, its 535 feet (175 meters) over the Delaware River, connects Lackawaxen, Pennsylvania to Minisink Ford, New York. The bridge opened in 1849 as an aqueduct connecting two parts of the Delaware & Hudson Canal. When the canal shutdown operations in 1898, it was converted for use as a vehicular bridge for wagons and later motor vehicles until 1979. It has been modified many times, matching the changing face of transportation. In 1980, the National Parks Service purchased it. To demonstrate the strength of Roebling’s design, almost all of the existing ironwork, — saddles, cables, and suspenders — were used in the bridge’s reconstruction by NPS.

Roebling Bridge Present DaySusie Kaspar is a Park Ranger with the National Park Service at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River. She obtained her BS in Parks and Recreation at East Illinois University and her Masters in Parks and Recreation with focus on Interpretation from Slippery Rock University.

Come and enjoy learning about how the Delaware and Hudson Valley was in the forefront of history-making engineering, the wire rope suspension system of John Roebling. Engineers and architects receive one PDH-CEU for attendance.

The RCSE can be accessed via the parking area and entrance near the corner of East Conkling and Wawayanda Avenues. Free parking is available in the parking garage on East Conkling Avenue or in the lot on Grandview Avenue, both on the Middletown campus of SUNY Orange.

Questions may be directed to (845)341-4891 or cultural@sunyorange.edu.

Images, top to bottom: Susie Kaspar, Park Ranger with the National Park Service at Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River; Historic John Roebling's Delaware Aqueduct in Operation; Roebling Bridge Present Day

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Contact Us:
Dorothy Szefc
Coordinator of Cultural Affairs
(845) 341-4891
cultural@sunyorange.edu

All Cultural Affairs Events are open to the public and all buildings are universally accessible.

NOTE: All artists' images on these pages are copyrighted and are used by kind permission of the artists. Please do not download, reproduce or use without permission.