2009 Archives

EXHIBITS

Lyrical Abstracts

~ multi-media collages by Gesine Ehlers

January 6 ~ February 13, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Another Happiness
mixed media collage

Photo: Description follows

Evening
mixed media collage

Photo: Description follows

Gesine Ehlers

Reception: Friday, January 30, 2009 6:30-7:30pm & 8:15pm

Gesine Ehlers of Unionville is an artist whose works are semi-abstract to fully abstract and are mixed media collages as she incorporates many textures and paints into her artworks.

Gesine Ehlers grew up in Berlin and Hamburg, Germany, where she received her art education. She came to New York City in her early twenties and later moved to Unionville, Orange County.

Living on a farm, her work became a "reflection of a life with nature."

She has shown her work widely in group and many one-woman exhibits in New York City and Orange County. Her works can also be found in private collections and galleries.

In the past, she has designed for environmental causes including creating the covers for Solar Age magazine. In addition, she has discovered her love for stained glass.

Since moving to Orange County, she has always been interested in supporting the arts in Orange County and, for many years, was part of Synechia Arts Center in Middletown, which offered classes and galleries for exhibition, and was funded for various community outreach programs. Later, she became one of the co-founders and directors of Studio 18 which for 10 years, was a successful artists' co-op gallery in Middletown.

This exhibit spans a few years of her work and features a selection of 27 collages dedicated to a young woman named Erika. A total of 60 works are on display.

Exhibit hours: Monday – Thursday 9am-8pm; Friday 9am-6pm, and during events in Orange Hall.

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

Hybrid Visions

~ an exhibition of hybrid instruments and collages made from recycled objects and images by Ken Butler

January 9 ~ February 13, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Taped Bike Seat Violin
instrument collage

Photo: Description follows

Red Lawnmower Guns
instrument collage

Photo: Description follows

Ken Butler

Reception: Friday, January 30, at approximately 8:15pm, immediately following the concert Voices of Anxious Objects

Ken Butler is an artist and musician whose hybrid musical instruments, collage drawings, performances, and installations explore the interaction and transformation of common objects, altered images, sounds and silence. His works have been featured in numerous exhibitions and performances throughout the USA, Canada, and Europe including The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and The Brooklyn Museum; Exit Art, Thread Waxing Space, The Kitchen, Lincoln Center, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City; and in several countries in South America as well as Thailand and Japan. His works have been reviewed in The New York Times, The Village Voice, Artforum, Smithsonian, and Sculpture Magazine and have been featured on PBS, CNN, MTV, and NBC, including a live appearance on The Tonight Show. Awards include fellowships from the Oregon Arts Commission, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Works by Ken Butler are represented in public and private collections in Portland, OR, Seattle, Vail, Los Angeles, Toronto, Montreal, and New York City including the permanent collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

More images related to this exhibit can be found here.

For related events, click here.

North East Watercolor Society Members' 2009 Show

February 19 ~ March 26, 2009
Orange Hall Galleries

Photo: Description follows

Essex River
watercolor by Brandy Brandenburg

Photo: Description follows

Good Old Buoys
watercolor by Brandy Brandenburg

Photo: Description follows

In Grandmother's Garden
watercolor by Pat Morgan

Photo: Description follows

Charles 'Brandy' Brandenburg, judge

Photo: Description follows

Elaine Garvin,
show chair

Photo: Description follows

Joy Zelada,
classical guitarist

Reception: Sunday, March 1 1-4:15pm

Demonstration by Charles “Brandy” Brandenburg:  2:30-3:45pm

Music provided by Joy Zelada, classical guitarist 1-2:30pm

Awards presentation: 3:50pm

Judge: Charles “Brandy” Brandenburg

Show Chair: Elaine Garvin

Co-Chairs: Patricia Morgan and Janet Campbell

About the judge/demonstrator:

Charles 'Brandy' Brandenburg paints in both oil and watercolor, primarily landscapes and marine paintings.

He is a member of American Artist Professional League, New Jersey Chapter, Ridgewood Art (NJ) Institute. He is Signature Member of NEWS and New Jersey Watercolor Society.

Brandy studied with Arthur Maynard, Allen Avery, Emile Gruppe, John Pike, and Ferdinand Petrie

His works are in the permanent collections of  C.P.C. International, New York, American Broadcasting Company, NY, Perillo Tours, New Jersey, W. Schmidt Enterprises, New Jersey, Bergen Print Plates, New Jersey and numerous private collections. He has had seven solo shows at large hotels in Atlantic City, NJ.

Among the many awards he has received with various art organizations, his paintings have also won awards in the 2005, 2006, 2007 at the American Artist Professional League.

Brandy teaches group and private lessons, demonstrates and judges for many art associations and currently teaches watercolor at the Ridgewood (NJ) Art Institute.

Exhibit hours: Monday – Thursday 9am-8pm; Friday 9am-6pm, and during events in Orange Hall.

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

"start|stop|re.wind" ~ 5th Annual Student Art Show

April 2 ~ May 1, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Artist Inspired Drawing
Charcoal on Paper
by Brittany Mollicone
of Middletown, NY

Photo: Description follows

Conceptual Drawing
Pastel on Paper
by Kyle Ross
of Pine Bush, NY

Photo: Description follows

Mandala
Mixed Media
by Diana Lane
of Port Jervis

Photo: Description follows

Still Life
Pastel on Paper
by Jillian Govier
of Westtown, NY

Photo: Description follows

Egyptian Style Painting
Acrylic on Paper
by Tatiana Vazquez
of Middletown, NY

Photo: Description follows

Mike Marquez
curator, organizer

Photo: Description follows

Carlton Jay
pianist

Photo: Description follows

Kelsey Byrne
vocalist & pianist

Photo: Description follows

Joy Zelada
classical guitarist

Reception: Monday, April 6  3-5pm

Music provided by Carlton Jay, pianist; Kelsey Byrne, vocalist & pianist; Joy Zelada, classical guitarist

This 5th Annual Student Art show entitled "start|stop|re.wind" will include over one hundred artworks ~ paintings, drawings, collage, design, photography, video, film, 3-dimensional, computer graphics.

The curator-organizer is Mike Marquez.

This show is produced by the Arts & Communications Department in cooperation with Cultural Affairs.

Gallery hours: Monday-Thursday 9am to 8pm and Fridays 9am to 6pm and during events in Orange Hall.

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

An exhibit of art works by faculty members will run concurrently in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

An exhibit of art works by Art Faculty will run concurrently in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

2009 Art Faculty Show

~paintings, photographs, digital giclee prints, drawings, collages, 3-dimensional works~

April 2 ~ May 1, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery Loft

Photo: Description follows

Night Platte
oil
by Susan Miiller

Photo: Description follows

Cityscape Series / Philadelphia
giclée print/digital collage
by Bruce Bleach

Photo: Description follows

A Delicate Balance
corrugated steel, handmade paper, hair, found objects
by Jacqueline O'Malley-Satz

Reception: Monday, April 6  3-5pm

Music provided by Carlton Jay, pianist; Kelsey Byrne, vocalist & pianist; Joy Zelada, classical guitarist

~paintings, photographs, digital giclee prints, drawings, collages, 3-dimensional works~

by Susan Slater-Tanner, Susan Miiller, Bruce Bleach, Jacqueline O'Malley-Satz, Aaron Weiss, Mary Mugele Sealfon, Randi Eisman, Linda Richichi, Pete Nozell

This show is produced by the Arts & Communications Department in cooperation with Cultural Affairs.

Gallery hours: Monday-Thursday 9am to 8pm and Fridays 9am to 6pm and during events in Orange Hall.

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

More images from the exhibit can be found here.

An exhibit of art works by Art Students will run concurrently in the Orange Hall Gallery.

Photography Watered-Down

photographs by Artur Charukhchyan and watercolors of the photographs by Stella Provenzano

May 7 ~ June 14, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery Loft

Photo: Description follows

Untitled
Photograph by
Artur Charukhchyan

Photo: Description follows

Untitled
Watercolor by Stella Provenzano

Photo: Description follows

Artur Charukhchyan

Photo: Description follows

Stella Provenzano

Photo: Description follows

Joy Zelada

Reception: Friday, May 15, 7-9pm

Music provided by Joy Zelada, classical guitarist.

Here is an interesting concept:  show the same image through two media.  Artur Charukhchyan and Stella Provenzano have chosen several of his photographs of varied topics, and then, Stella has created watercolor paintings on the same subjects. The show will be hung in this manner, too.  In addition, both artists will exhibit works different from one another.

The venue for this show is Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

Artur Charukhchyan is a world traveler who loves to record his travels through photographs.  Originally from Tbilisi, Georgia, he presently lives in Middletown. His work has been exhibited once before at the SUNY Orange student gallery two years ago.  One of his photographs was also featured in the exhibit “Montréal Industriel” at the Historical Center of Montreal in 2008.

His inspiration comes from traveling and seeing new places. Artur states, “My eyes take in the scenery surrounding me, and I find myself being in constant search of ‘that perfect shot.’ I do not wait for it, but rather take what I am given right there and then using framing and the available light to compose the photograph. Then, if I feel it to be necessary, I employ the power of digital editing to polish it off.”

His works reflect the beauty he discerns in nature combined with that of the manmade world – architecture. In many of his photographs “the two complement each other in a distinctive way to produce a piece that continues to inspire me after my trip is over and I am back home.”  He continues, “I never buy souvenirs on my trips: my photographs are my souvenirs.”

You may view his photographs, or contact him by visiting his web site at ScenicRealm.com.

Stella Provenzano is a watercolorist who was a long-time resident of Orange County, NY, and is a retiree of Orange County Community College.  She is a self-taught artist whose work has been influenced by Katherine Maeder, her mentor and friend.  She presently lives in Bushkill, PA.  She is a member of the Pocono Arts Council and has shown her work in and around the Stroudsburg area.  Her works may be found in private collections and at the Peanut Gallery in Saba, Netherlands Antilles.  You may view her paintings, or contact her by visiting her web site at stellaprovenzano.com.

Her paintings celebrate the colors she experiences during her travels.

As an artist Stella feels that she has “developed a third eye.”  She states, “ I now see my surroundings in more vivid colors, smoother curves, and sharper lines.  I look at the tiny details in Cyprepedium acaule (Slipper Orchids), or an expansive rain forest, and I consider how I might express them on my watercolor block.  I feel very fortunate to have found my passion for painting.”  

Stella is the author and illustrator of a children’s book entitled “How Rusty Rooster Found His Do.”

Gallery hours:

  • Monday-Thursday 9am to 8pm and Fridays 9am to 6pm and during events in Orange Hall.
  • Starting on May 18, the Gallery will be open Monday through Thursday, 9am to 7pm.
  • Additional hours are Friday and Saturday, June 12 and 13, from 7 to 9pm and Sunday, June 14 from 2:30 to 4:30pm.  

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

More images from the exhibit can be found here.

The 2009 Middletown Art Group Spring Exhibition will be on display in the Orange Hall Gallery from May 11 to June 14.

The 2009 Middletown Art Group Spring Exhibition

May 11 ~ June 14, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Our House
pastel
Catherine DeMaio

Photo: Description follows

Seated Angel
water mixable oil paint
Ray Schuettich

Photo: Description follows

Juneburst
watercolor
Mary Evelyn Whitehill

Photo: Description follows

Andrew Lattimore
judge

Photo: Description follows

Beverly Poyerd
pianist

Reception: Sunday, May 17, from 1 to 4pm

An awards ceremony will take place during the reception and music will be provided by Beverly Poyerd of Washingtonville, pianist, from 1 to 3pm.

Judge: Andrew Lattimore

The 2009 Middletown Art Group Spring Exhibition will be on exhibit in Orange Hall Gallery May 11 ~ June 14, 2009. 100+ works representing many different styles and media will be represented. Representational as well as abstract styles will be included in the following media: drawings, graphics, photographs, collages, mixed media, plus paintings in oil, acrylic, pastel, and watercolor.

The Middletown Art Group [MAG], which numbers approximately 75 members, has been an active art organization in Orange County for nearly 60 years. Although many of its members reside in the Middletown area, a little more than half the membership live in other parts of Orange County as well as Sullivan, Ulster, Dutchess, Pike, and Sussex Counties.

Prior to the exhibition’s opening reception, works will be judged by award-winning artist Andrew Lattimore of Highland Mills. An awards ceremony will take place during the reception which is slated for Sunday, May 17, 2009 from 1pm to 4pm. Also, Pianist Beverly Poyerd of Washingtonville will play from 1 to 3pm. The president of MAG is Jill Constantino who is an art teacher at Middletown High School

Exhibit hours:

  • Monday – Thursday 9am-8pm; Friday 9am-6pm, and during events in Orange Hall.
  • Starting on May 18, the Gallery will be open Monday through Thursday, 9am to 7pm.
  • Addition hours are Friday and Saturday, June 12 and 13, from 7 to 9pm and Sunday, June 14, from 2:30 to 4:30pm.  

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

The exhibit Photography Watered-Down will be on display in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft from May 7 to June 14.

Interpretations in Several Media

~ Artworks by Raisa DeFusto and Catherine DeMaio: oils, watercolors, pastels, collages

June 16 ~ July 19, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery Loft

Photo: Description follows

Spring Foliage on Erie Canal
oil on canvas
Raisa DeFusto

Photo: Description follows

The Race
oil
Catherine DeMaio

Photo: Description follows

Raisa DeFusto

Photo: Description follows

Catherine DeMaio

Reception: Sunday, June 28, 2008 1-4pm

The artists will be present at the reception.

Raisa DeFusto is a resident of Fairport, NY. Her love of nature is the inspiration for her paintings.  She attempts to show a landscape in the light of a single moment. The two media through which she expresses herself are oil and watercolor. However, all her works in this show are done in oils. Raisa received her BS in Education and Certification in Library Science from SUNY Geneseo.  Her career in education began as a school librarian in the Schenectady Public Schools.  Then, after raising two children, she became an elementary teacher in Fairport where she taught for 23 years. While at SUNY Geneseo her elective art classes were with Dr. Paul H. Hepler, and after retirement in 1998, she enrolled in classes with Susan Sweet at BOCES.  At the present time, six of her artworks are exhibited at the Williams Gallery in Rochester.

Catherine DeMaio is a resident of Middletown, NY. She loves to experiment and she does so in many media, including collage, oil, watercolor, pastel, pen & ink, and crayons. Catherine is a working artist and art teacher. She is well-known in this area for her classes in Cartoon Drawing for both adults and children. She is a member of several art groups, namely the North East Watercolor Society, the Middletown Art Group, the River Valley Artists Guild, and the Garrett Society. She received an AA from Orange County Community College, a BA from SUNY New Paltz, and an MA in Art Education from SUNY New Paltz. She exhibits her works often in many shows throughout the year.

Exhibit hours: During June and July, the gallery is open Monday-Thursday 9am-7pm. Additional gallery hours are Friday, June 19 and Saturday, June 20 — 7 to 9pm and Sunday, June 21 — 2:30 to 5pm; Friday, July 17 – 6 to 8pm, Saturday, July 18 —  6 to 8pm, and Sunday, July 19 — 2:30to 4:30pm.

The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

You may also be interested in The 2009 River Valley Artists Guild Summer Show art exhibition currently on display downstairs in the Orange Hall Gallery.

The 2009 River Valley Artists Guild Summer Show

June 19 ~ July 19, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Summer Idyl
watercolor
Judith Hill Gordon

Photo: Description follows

A Winter Ride
Cooperstown, NY
pastels
Joan Kehlenbeck

Photo: Description follows

Joan Kehlenbeck,
artist/demonstrator

Photo: Description follows

Tonya Jacobs,
pianist

Reception: Sunday, June 28, 2008 1-4pm

Music provided by Tonya Jacobs, pianist 1-2:45pm

“Illusions of Motion in Pastel” ~ demonstration by Joan Kehlenbeck: 3pm

The River Valley Artists Guild [RVAG] show, with 70 works in many media, will be on display in Orange Hall Gallery, June 19~ July 19, 2009.

The River Valley Artists Guild  was started by the late Bernie Kilbourn, along with Matilda Grech, Paul Horsman, Elaine Tedesco, and Elizabeth Hayes all of Port Jervis. The present president and show chairwoman is Joan Kehlenbeck.  Although, most of its sixty members come from communities bordering the Delaware River, many come from Middletown, Poughkeepsie, and Monroe as well as Branchville, NJ and Milford, PA..

Joan Kehlenbeck has always lived in the country as she lived in Forestburgh, Sullivan County as a girl, and now resides in Cuddebackville, Orange County.  Living in the country has made artwork an extension of her life. Her goal is to capture the beauty of nature and preserve it for others to enjoy forever. Local scenes, historical buildings, and portraits are her favorite subjects. She works in pastels, charcoal, and oils but this demonstration will deal solely with pastels.

Tonya Jacobs, who is a lifelong resident of Milford, PA, is a voice and piano teacher.  She has a BA from Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA and an MA from Marywood University, Scranton, PA.  She has performed with the Presby Players in Port Jervis and in the Jimmy Sturr Christmas Shows. She has also sung with two different choirs at Carnegie Hall.

Exhibit hours: During June and July, the gallery is open Monday-Thursday 9am-7pm. Additional gallery hours are Friday, June 19 and Saturday, June 20 — 7 to 9pm and Sunday, June 21 — 2:30 to 5pm; Friday, July 17 – 6 to 8pm, Saturday, July 18 —  6 to 8pm, and Sunday, July 19 — 2:30to 4:30pm.

The exhibit, reception, demonstration, and music are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

You may also be interested in the art exhibition Interpretations in Several Media ~ Artworks by Raisa DeFusto and Catherine DeMaio: oils, watercolors, pastels, collages currently on display upstairs in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

Visual Comparisons on Botanical Art

~paintings by Rosalind Hodgkins and Roberta Rosenthal

July 22 ~ August 14, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery Loft

Photo: Description follows

P.J. M. Rhododendron
watercolor/gouache
Roberta Rosenthal

Photo: Description follows

Sunflower Group
watercolor
Rosalind Hodgkins

Photo: Description follows

Roberta Rosenthal

Photo: Description follows

Rosalind Hodgkins

Photo: Description follows

Judith Hosmer Garrett,
pianist

Reception: Saturday, July 25, 2009 1-4pm

Music provided by Judith Hosmer Garrett, pianist, 1:30-3:30pm

Rosalind Hodgkins of Port Jervis and Roberta Rosenthal of Bloomingburg are well-known area artists who paint various subjects in several media. However, from July 22 through August 14, the specialty which they have in common --botanical art-- is the subject of their duo show. In this exhibit, Visual Comparisons on Botanical Art, viewers will have the opportunity to see the delicate petals and vivid colors of flowers without background or scenery - science, but truly art. The venue is Orange Hall Gallery Loft, Orange County Community College.

Rosalind Hodgkins grew up in Maine, but after she graduated from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, she lived and worked in New York City for forty years. Her career was centered on abstract painting in oil, exploring the perception of form, space, and color. When she found her way to the Cuddebackville-Port Jervis area near the Delaware River, she was rejuvenated by the ever-present natural scene. She became focused on the flora and fauna of the region and her art mirrored her interests by her painting flowers and plants, both botanicals and landscapes, as well as indigenous animals. She also shifted to using watercolors as her medium which she prefers now because it allows her to layer and create fine detail.

Roberta Rosenthal was born and raised in the Bronx. She graduated from the High School of Art & Design and the Fashion Institute of Technology both in New York City. Roberta studied botanical art at the New York Botanical Garden, oil painting at the Art Students League, Asian brush painting at the Koho School of Sumi-e and privately with modern Chinese master Kou Liang Jui. She has worked as a staff designer for Macy's and textile corporations. Roberta also founded RSR Designs an art studio in Manhattan. Her fine art has been featured on postage stamps, books, magazines, packaging, stationary, giftware and many products. Roberta has been an art instructor at the New York Botanical Gardens Continuing Adult Education Department, Mount Saint Mary College’s Desmond Campus, the Wallkill River School in Montgomery, the Institute for Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, and the Catskill Art Society in Hurleyville-all in New York State. She paints in watercolor, gouache, oils, and mixed media.

Exhibit hours: The hours in July are Monday through Thursday 9am to 7pm. The hours in August are Monday through Friday 9am to 7pm. Also, Fri, August 8 from 6:30 to 8pm, and Sat, August 9 from 2:30 pm to 4pm

The exhibit, reception and music are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

You may also be interested in the art exhibition Artists in the Garden currently on display downstairs in the main Orange Hall Gallery.

Artists in the Garden

July 24 ~ August 14, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Logo: The Garden Lovers' Club

Photo: Description follows

Steve Blumenthal

Photo: Description follows

David Munford

Logo: The Wallkill River School

Photo: Description follows

Virginia Moore

Photo: Description follows

Shawn Dell Joyce

Photo: Description follows

Judith Hosmer Garrett,
pianist

This art exhibition is presented by the Garden Lovers Club of Middletown, NY, and produced by the Wallkill River School.

Reception: Saturday, July 25, 2009 1-4pm

Music provided by Judith Hosmer Garrett, pianist, 1:30-3:30pm

During the Hidden Gardens Tour presented by the Garden Lovers Club of Middletown, NY, in June, artists of the Wallkill River School paint scenes on the Tour gardens which are located in Middletown, Howells, and Deerpark. The co-chair of the 2009 Tour was Virginia Moore of Middletown who is both a gardener and an artist as well as a professor of environmental science and physics. Shawn Dell Joyce is the founder of the Wallkill River School.

From July 24 through August 14, 2009, these paintings will be on display in Orange Hall Gallery in an art exhibition entitled Artists in the Garden.

In addition, the artworks will be for sale in a silent auction. The exhibit will include at least 50 works in several media.

During the reception on Saturday, July 25, 2009, Judith Hosmer Garrett of Montgomery will play selections on piano, some of which she and her husband, Howard, composed.

Exhibit hours: The hours in July are Monday through Thursday 9am to 7pm. The hours in August are Monday through Friday 9am to 7pm. Also, Fri, August 8 from 6:30 to 8pm, and Sat, August 9 from 2:30 pm to 4pm

The exhibit, reception and music are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

You may also be interested in the art exhibition Visual Comparisons on Botanical Art ~paintings by Rosalind Hodgkins and Roberta Rosenthal currently on display upstairs in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

Stereoscopic 3D ~ Photography with the Depth of Normal Vision

by Stuart Stiles, Professor Emeritus, SUNY Orange

August 20 ~ September 25, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery Loft

Photo: description follows

The collage image above shows a Victorian era stereo photographer at work above New York City; the Holmes type stereoscope in which his photos would have been viewed; a 35 mm Realist film stereo camera, one of the most popular stereo cameras in the 1950s; and, on the bottom, an image released by Fuji, showing a 2009 entry into the field of digital stereo photography and video, the Fuji Real 3D W1.

Photo: Description follows

Prof. Stuart Stiles

Reception: Saturday, August 29, 2009, 2:30-5pm

Music provided by Joy Zelada, classical guitar, 2:45-4:45pm

Professor Stiles is presenting a master class entitled 3D Stereo Digital Photography on Monday, September 14, 2009 from 11am-12:45pm.

The exhibit of stereo photography provides an overview of techniques that have emerged since the earliest emulsions to the yet to be marketed digital stereo camera by Fuji. The Fuji Real 3D W1 will be on the market in September 2009.

Stereo photographer, author, publisher and educator, Prof. Stuart Stiles has organized museum exhibits using his collection of stereoscopic images, cameras, and viewers. He has written, “Stereoscopic Saratoga Springs: approaching and entering the twentieth century,” a book that takes readers/viewers on a virtual 3D tour of the resort at Saratoga Springs, New York in the Victorian era. He has conducted workshops for the Interactive Museum in Middletown, NY where children learned to create their own stereo cameras and to prepare their photographs for stereo viewing.

As a retired member of the psychology faculty at Orange County Community College, he has presented stereo photography related courses for the ENCORE program at the college. He has presented workshops and stereo theater shows at the New York Stereoscopic Society and at conventions of the National Stereoscopic Association. He has shared his digital stereo images in the Stereoscopic Society of America’s online folio. A selection of his stereo photos is included on “THE 2003 3D CD EXPO.”

After a career of thirty three years in the psychology faculty at the College, Prof. Stiles is operating a stereo photography studio as a retirement activity. He maintains a web site for the studio that links to stereoscopic related events:

http://www.pioneeris.net/sstiles

Exhibit hours: The hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Friday 9am to 6pm.

The exhibit, reception and music are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images related to this exhibit can be found here.

Historic Photographic Printmaking

Mythical Gardens & Enduring Stones by Sandra C. Davis

August 21 ~ September 25, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: description follows

Stairwell in
Chateau L ’Herm
Platinum/Palladium
20 x 8, 2000

Photo: Description follows

Sandra C. Davis
(Photo by Abe Aronow)

Reception: 6 to 7pm on Monday, September 21, 2009. Photographer/ printmaker Sandra C. Davis will be present.

The reception will be followed by a master class/demonstration in Orange Hall Gallery starting at 7pm on Monday, September 21.

An exhibit of Historic Photographic Printmaking will be on display in Orange Hall Gallery August 21 ~ September 25, 2009.  The exhibit actually explains two different techniques – Gum Bichromate and Platinum/Palladium and the examples are entitled

Mythical Gardens ~ images in Gum Bichromate

Enduring Stones ~ images in hand-coated Platinum/Palladium

The works depict images in Ireland, England, France, and throughout North America. A short reception at which the photographer/printmaker will be present is scheduled from 6 to 7pm on Monday, September 21, 2009.

The photographer/printmaker who is exhibiting her works is Sandra C. Davis of Burlington, NJ who will also give a master class with demonstration entitled Historic Photographic Printmaking: The Gum Bichromate Process. This presentation will also bring into discussion the processes of  Platinum/Palladium and Cyanotype.and how these three differ from regular silver (black & white) photography.  During the master class, Ms Davis will touch on the ideas of why she photographs and why she chooses particular processes for different subjects. The master class/demonstration, which is free and open to the public, will take place in Orange Hall Gallery starting at 7pm on Monday, September 21.

Sandra C. Davis has a BFA in Illustration,  Moore College of Art and an MFA in Book Arts/Printmaking, The University of the Arts. She teaches non-silver printmaking processes at The University of the Arts in Philadelphia and also teaches non-silver printmaking and gum bichromate printing at Rowan University in Glassboro, NJ, Mercer County College, NJ and Peters Valley Craft Center in Layton, NJ. She has published several artist books and been a  contributing writer to A Non-silver Manual by Sarah Van Keuren. In addition, she has had work published in The Book of Alternative Processes, Second Edition by Christopher James.

Exhibit hours: The hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Friday 9am to 6pm; closed Labor Day weekend.

The exhibit, reception and master class/demonstration are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from this exhibit can be found here.

Deerest Deerpark

~ painted sculptures and paintings

September 29 ~ October 16, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Deerest Hawk's Nest Then and Now
Susan Miiller

Photo: Description follows

Deerpark Chakra
Alyta Adams

Photo: Description follows

Sunset Deer
Mike Jaroszko

Photo: Description follows

Deerly Beloved
Elaine Cardella-Tedesco

Reception: Saturday, October 3, 2009 1-3pm

Music provided by Judith Hosmer Garrett, pianist.

Deerest Deerpark ~ painted sculptures and paintings curated by Susan Miiller, Adjunct Associate Professor of Art, SUNY Orange.

This exhibit is sponsored by a grant from Orange County Tourism and County of Orange.

The venue for this show is Orange Hall Gallery.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

The exhibit and reception are free & open to the public.

More images from the exhibit can be found here.

Historic Orange County Architecture

October 25 ~ December 16, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery

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Bellvale Church
Greek Revivial architecture
oil painting
by Sarah McHugh

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Green Chapel
Carpenter Gothic architecture
watercolor painting
by Lana Privitera

Logo: First Federal Savings of Middletown

Exhibit Sponsor:
First Federal Savings of Middletown

Logo: Orange County Citizens Foundation

Exhibit Co-organizer:
Orange County Citizens Foundation Exhibit Committee

Logo: Orange County Citizens Foundation

Carlton Jay

Reception: Sunday, October 25, 2009 from 1:30 to 4pm. Music will be provided by Carlton Jay of Montgomery.

Historic Orange County  Architecture is coming to Orange Hall Gallery after being on display for one month in the Seligmann Studio, Sugar Loaf.  This show was organized by Cultural Affairs at SUNY Orange and the Orange County Citizens Foundation Exhibit Committee. In addition, some new works will be included. Nearly 100 paintings, pen & inks, and photographs give a pictorial visit of the historic architecture around the county. Works by 40 artists comprise the exhibit.

This exhibit is sponsored by First Federal Savings of Middletown.

The exhibits will be on view October 25 ~ December 16, 2009.

Exhibit hours: The hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Friday 9am to 6pm; closed during Thanksgiving Recess, Wednesday, November 25 to Friday, November 27.

The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from the exhibit can be found here.

You may also be interested in the exhibit Orange County Landscapes, which is concurrently on display in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

Orange County Landscapes

October 25 ~ December 16, 2009
Orange Hall Gallery Loft

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Storm over Black Dirt Fields
oil on wood
by Robert Lewis Hoover

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Autumn Fields
oil on canvas
by Leslie Waxtel

Logo: First Federal Savings of Middletown

Exhibit Sponsor:
First Federal Savings of Middletown

Logo: Orange County Citizens Foundation

Carlton Jay

Reception: Sunday, October 25, 2009 from 1:30 to 4pm. Music will be provided by Carlton Jay of Montgomery.

Orange County Landscapes is a show of paintings by ten artists in watercolor, pastels, oils, and acrylics which will be on display in Orange Hall Gallery Loft. These works range from very representational to semi-abstract and soft tones to bright tones.

This exhibit is sponsored by First Federal Savings of Middletown.

The exhibits will be on view October 25 ~ December 16, 2009.

Exhibit hours: The hours are Monday through Thursday 9am to 8pm and Friday 9am to 6pm; closed during Thanksgiving Recess, Wednesday, November 25 to Friday, November 27.

The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images from the exhibit can be found here.

You may also be interested in the exhibit Historic Orange County Architecture, which is concurrently on display in the Orange Hall Gallery.

PERFORMANCES

Voices of Anxious Objects

~ a concert: Ken Butler performs on hybrid instruments accompanied by Bill Buchen, percussionist and Roger Lipson, bassist

Friday, January 30, 2009 @ 7:30pm
Orange Hall Gallery

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Ken Butler

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Bill Buchen

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Roger Lipson

Admission is free.

Reception immediately following the concert in Orange Hall Gallery

Ken Butler is musician who plays many of his hybrid instruments. He has performed in numerous concerts on his instruments on both the east and west coasts. Ken, who is a resident of Brooklyn and originally from Portland, Oregon, will give a free concert on them accompanied by percussionist Bill Buchen and bassist Roger Lipson.

Ken Butler studied viola as a child and maintained an interest in music while studying visual arts in France, at Colorado College (BA in studio art), and Portland State University where he completed his MFA in painting. He has performed with John Zorn, Laurie Anderson, Butch Morris, The Soldier String Quartet, The Tonight Show Band, and The Master Gnawa musicians of Morocco. His CD, Voices of Anxious Objects is on Zorn's Tzadik label.

Bill Buchen has studied percussion with Kadar Khan, Pandit Samir Chattergee,  Anand Kumar Mallick, South Indian Percussion with T.S. Nandakumar and most recently with Ustad Zakir Hussein.  He has performed with Indofunk.Steve Gorn, Gigi, and Drala. He may be heard on the following CDs:  Indofunk,  Bill Laswell's Sacred System Nagual Site, Sacred System II, and  Revelator with Raoul Bjorkenheim & N. Skopelitis, Drala, David Van Tieghem, Jay Clayton and Laurie Anderson. He performed on Broadway for the musical Bombay Dreams. Along with his wife Mary Buchen, he is  co-director of Sonic Architecture and designs interactive sculptural installations for science museums,  public plazas, children's museums and art galleries throughout the world.

Roger Lipson is a multi-instrumentalist who specializes in the music of India. He has been playing the sitar since 1988 and has studied most recently with Pandit Krishna Mohan Bhatt (a disciple of Ravi Shankar).  He has been studying the shehani (Indian oboe) since 2001 and is studying with Ustad Fateh Ali Khan (a family member of the legendary Bismillah Khan).  He has recorded for  PBS Nova series; Tipping Point by The Cringe (distributed by Sony/Red); soundtrack for a Japanese Anime short; Bollywood demos.  He has performed at The Rubin Museum; B.B. King's; The State Theater - New Brunswick, NJ; The Highline Ballroom; Symphony Space; The World Cafe - Live (Philadelphia). He has been playing bass since 1987 and has played in a wide variety of musical settings including: Blink (trio playing originals & jazz) &  currently, Love Me Do - The Beatles Tribute.

Also, a master class, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for Friday, January 30, 2009 at noon in Orange Hall, Room 23. The topic of the master class is The Creation of Hybrid Instruments: Their Art and Sound.

More images related to this performance can be found here.

For related events, click here.

City that Drinks the Mountain Sky

~ a children/family theater production by ARM-OF-THE-SEA mask & puppet theater

Sunday, February 8, 2009 @ 2pm
Orange Hall Theater

Photo: Description follows

Image from City that Drinks the Mountain Sky

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Image from City that Drinks the Mountain Sky

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Image from City that Drinks the Mountain Sky

Admission: $8-general public; $7-senior citizens/ SUNY Orange alumni, faculty, staff; $4-children/students (aged 3 to 16); free SUNY Orange credit students; group rates

City that Drinks the Mountain Sky
~ a children/family theater production by ARM-OF-THE-SEA mask & puppet theater

Heralded as one of the wonders of the world, New York City's ingenious system of aqueducts and reservoirs (Ashokan, Neversink, Rondout and more) provides clear mountain water from the Catskills to nine million downstate residents. And though the struggle over these water resources has, at times, bitterly divided city managers and watershed residents, it has also irrevocably united them.

Through a shimmering tapestry of poetry, puppetry, and evocative music, City that Drinks the Mountain Sky brings alive the lyrical landscape of the Catskills - to portray the on-going story of the watershed and the uneasy marriage of those who must protect its vulnerable flowing treasure. The play traces life's quintessential liquid from mountain top to city tap.

ARM-OF-THE-SEA Theater is a Hudson Valley company based in Malden-on Hudson, NY. The troupe blends the arts of acting, poetry, fiber arts, puppetry, and music in presenting an educational message in a fascinating manner. A Study Guide is available in advance, and children and their family members are invited to ask questions following the play.

Hector Martignon and Foreign Affair

~ a concert: Latin—Brazilian—World Jazz

Friday, February 20, 2009 @ 8pm
Orange Hall Theater

Photo: Description follows

Hector Martignon

Admission: $9-adults; $7-senior citizens/alumni/faculty/staff; free all students; group rates. See below for more ticket information.

Hector Martignon and his ensemble, Foreign Affair will present a concert of Latin, Brazilian, and World Jazz in Orange Hall Theater on Friday, February 20, 2009 at 8pm.

The ensemble is comprised of Hector Martignon, piano; Armando Gola, bass; Ludwig Afonso, drums; Chistos Rafalides, vibraphone; and Samuel Torres, percussion.

Hector Martignon was pianist for the late Ray Barretto's various ensembles. During his eight-year association with Barretto, his contributions as pianist, arranger, and composer were fundamental in shaping the sound of the now famous New World Spirit Sextet. One of his last collaborations with Barretto, "My Summertime," was a favorite nominee for a Grammy award. His versatility has also made him extremely active in the film and television industries. Besides playing all piano parts, he arranged and produced many parts of the score for the Oscar-nominated film Eat, Drink, Man, Woman by Ang Lee and performed the piano and keyboard parts for the movie scores Gloria and Relativity. He is composer of the original music of Septimo Cielo, which won international prizes. He also collaborated in the production of many Broadway musicals (Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The Capeman, Selena Forever) as conductor, arranger, and co-composer.

His group has developed a sound which is both eclectic and electric. The group has performed on BET television festivals, at jazz clubs in Manhattan, and in clubs and open-air festivals in his native Colombia and in Europe.

Hector Martignon has a varied background of musical genres and plays both classical music as well as jazz. He is on the faculty of Lucy Moses School of Music and the Special Music School at the renowned Kaufman Center, NYC.

Also, a master class, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for Friday, February 20, at noon in Orange Hall, Room 23. The topic of the master class is Experiencing Musics of the World with Hector Martignon.

More images related to this performance can be found here.

Tickets are available at the Student Activities desk in the George F. Shepard Student Center, corner of South St and East Conkling Ave, Middletown, 9am to 7:30pm Monday through Thursday and on 9am to 4:30pm Friday. General seating: $9-adults; $7-senior citizens/alumni/faculty/staff; free all students; group rates Tickets will also be available at the Orange Hall box office the evening of the performance starting at 7pm.

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Readings & Musical Interlude

Celebrating Black Cultural History in Orange History

Sunday, February 22, 2009 @ 3pm
Morrison Hall Mansion

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Samuel Wright

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Beverly Poyerd

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Clarence and Greer Cooper

This event is also listed under Poetry.

Admission: Free & open to the public

Readings & Musical Interlude: Celebrating Black Cultural History in Orange History

A Reading of Langston Hughes Poems and Writings by Samuel Wright, actor

and A Reading of Poems by James Weldon Johnson by Greer Cooper

with Musical Interlude of John Rosamond Johnson/James Weldon Johnson works by Beverly Poyerd, pianist & Clarence Cooper, EdD, tenor & Greer Cooper, alto

and Introduction on Greenwood Forest Farms by Paul Kwame Johnson

The Orange County Citizens Foundation annual exhibit Read All About It displayed books written by present or past residents of Orange County. As an extension of this exhibit and to bring the works “alive,” readings of selections are being scheduled in several venues in Orange County.

Cultural Affairs/Lyceum at Orange County Community College is co-sponsoring an event during which writings by Langston Hughes and James Weldon Johnson, and music by John Rosamond Johnson with lyrics by his brother James Weldon Johnson will be featured. In addition, an introduction will be presented on Greenwood Forest Farms.

The program will take place in Morrison Hall Mansion, 115 South St, Middletown, NY on the college campus at 3pm on Sunday, February 22, 2009. Admission is free. Orange County Community College campus is ADA compliant.

Present-day Orange County residents will read and play. “Lion King” Actor Samuel Wright, of Walden, will read selections of poems and writings of Langston Hughes. Beverly Poyerd, pianist of Washingtonville, and Clarence Cooper, tenor and Greer Cooper, alto, of Newburgh will perform a musical interlude of music and lyrics written by the Johnson brothers, including “Lift Every Voice and Sing” which has come to be known in the United States as the African-American National Anthem. Greer Cooper will also read a selection of poems by James Weldon Johnson.

Hughes and the Johnsons were part-time residents of Greenwood Forest Farms, an early 20th C resort community for African- Americans in southern Orange County. They also were active in the Harlem Renaissance.

Paul Kwame Johnson of Warwick, will give an introduction on Greenwood Forest Farms. Paul Kwame Johnson is the Coordinator of the Visual and Performing Arts Institute at the Glenn E. Hines Memorial Boys and Girls Club of Newburgh. Dr. Clarence Cooper is the Assistant Principal of Newburgh Free Academy. Greer Cooper is a free-lance writer and events coordinator. Beverly Poyerd is a music therapist and piano instructor.

Swimming with the Polar Bears

—one man confronts his powerlessness—

Friday, April 3, 2009 @ 8pm
Orange Hall Theater

Photo: swimming polar bear, only head is visible

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Mel England
playwright/actor

Admission: $5-adults/senior citizens/alumni/faculty/staff; free all students; group rates

Swimming with the Polar Bears

—one man confronts his powerlessness—

~ a play about the environment and sustainability by playwright/actor: Mel England

In a funny, poignant, and devastatingly personal look at the dangers of global warming, playwright/actor Mel England returns to 'one-man land' with his new Swimming with the Polar Bears. Exploring the parallels between contemporary life, ancient Eskimo mythology, and the horrifying threat of the loss of an endangered species and  in the tradition of Spalding Gray, England's monologue reveals his personal story, using his own battles with extinction—from overcoming cancer to surviving childhood abuse—as a backdrop for larger questions of how we all can survive on our precious planet.  England's fantastical journey brings Polar Bears to life—and in the process, we find out how we are all Swimming with the Polar Bears.

Mel England wrote and developed this play to promote SUNY Orange’s 2009 theme-sustainability.  This performance is the play’s premiere!

Mel England will also be conducting a workshop/master class called Creating a Play on Thursday, April 2, from 2-4pm in Orange Hall Theater.

Mel England was a Tisch School of the Arts Trustee Scholar at NYU’s BFA Acting Program, who also studied with Stella Adler, Terry Schreiber, and with members of the Royal Shakespeare Company at the British American Theatre Institute. He  starred in the NY premiere of Israel Horovitz's one-man play about September 11th, 3 Weeks After Paradise at the Cherry Lane as well as Orange Hall Theatre in 2002. He also performed in his own one-man show Navajo Memoirs at the NY Fringe and Los Angeles.  Off-Broadway he's appeared at the Pearl Theatre in Hecuba, Misanthrope (understudy) and Marriage (understudy).  He's the recipient of the NY Fringe Festival's "Best Acting Ensemble Award" for Lucky Man, and "Best Play of the Year" in Denver for the Regional Premiere of A Shayba Naudel. He has been a part of several original New York productions, including Midsummer Night's Dream in Washington Square, Honeysuckles, developed for television by FOX, and King of Connecticut with Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Unlaunch'd Voices ~ An Evening with Walt Whitman

with Stephen Collins, actor

Tuesday, April 7, 2009 @ 6pm
Assembly Room 221, Newburgh Campus

Photo: Description follows

Stephen Collins
actor

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Walt Whitman
as a young man

Admission: $4-adults/senior citizens/alumni; free -faculty/staff/ all students; group rates

Sponsored by New York State funding acquired by Senator William J. Larkin Jr.

Walt Whitman comes to SUNY Orange’s Newburgh campus in the person of Stephen Collins at 6pm on Tuesday, April 7, 2009 in the one-man play

Unlaunch'd Voices ~ An Evening with Walt Whitman.

The play opens with the elderly Whitman on the evening of his seventieth birthday. The audience is a visitor in his room as he prepares for his birthday celebration. Whitman begins to reminisce and to question his success as a man and a poet.  He remembers a mystical experience he had in his thirty-seventh year that inspired him to write poetry. During the telling, Whitman transforms into his young vibrant self and traces back the experiences that led to the creation of Leaves Of Grass, his lifetime work.

The play was conceived and is performed by Stephen Collins, written and directed by Micheal Keamy. Through the play, the audience learns about Walt Whitman’s humanity, his individuality, and his inestimable contribution to the modem form of poetry—free verse.

In act two Whitman’s life is changed forever by the occurrence of the Civil War. It is here that he finds “... the most important work of my life...” nursing the wounded soldiers in the hospitals. Through poetry and readings of actual letters, the audience experiences Whitman’s movement from selfishness to selflessness and his growth into a mature artist who is at peace about “himself, God and death.”

Actor Stephen Collins has devoted the last dozen years of his life to the performance of this play. He has received rave reviews both for his performance and fluency with the poetry as well as his uncanny physical similarity to Walt Whitman.

The performance of Unlaunch'd Voices ~ An Evening with Walt Whitman is being sponsored by New York State funding acquired by Senator William J. Larkin Jr. who did so in order that more cultural events could be brought to Newburgh.

The play will take place in Assembly Room 221 on the Newburgh Campus of Orange County Community College which is ADA compliant and located at One Washington Center. Admission at the door is $4 for adults, senior citizens, and alumni, and free for all faculty/staff and students from any institution; group rates are available, too.

Questions may be directed to (845)562-2454 or (845) 341-4891.

More information about the play may be found at Unlaunch'd Voices web site. (This link will take you away from the SUNY Orange web site. The college cannot be responsible for the contents of this site. This link will open in a new window.)

Chris Parker Band

Featuring Chris Vadala, wind instruments; Chris Parker, piano; Rob Thomas, violin; Marko Marcinko, drums; Tony Marino, bass

Friday, October 16, 2009 @ 8pm
Orange Hall Theatre

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Chris Vadala,
wind instruments

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Rob Thomas,
violin

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Tony Marino,
bass

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Chris Parker,
piano

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Marko Marcinko,
drums

Admission: $11 Adults; $8 Alumni & Senior Citizens; free—All Students; group rates

Chris Vadala, a virtuoso on the sax, clarinet, and flute, known well for his years playing with the Chuck Mangione Quartet, will be the featured musician when the Chris Parker Band performs on the stage of Orange Hall Theatre on Friday, October 16, 2009 at 8pm.

Tickets are available at the George F. Shepard Center through 4pm October 16 and then at the box office in Orange Hall starting at 7pm. Admission: $11 Adults; $8 Faculty/Staff/Alumni/ Senior Citizens; free--All Students; group rates

Chris Vadala, who is a native of Poughkeepsie, NY, has performed in concert in all 50 states, plus Canada, Australia, Japan, Philippines, China, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Bermuda, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Dominican Republic, England, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, and Switzerland. In addition, he has performing credits on five gold and two platinum albums, plus two Grammy, one Emmy, one Georgie and one Golden Globe awards.  He has performed and/or recorded with such greats as Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, B.B. King, Chick Corea, Ella Fitzgerald, Aretha Franklin, Placido Domingo, Sarah Vaughn, Natalie Cole, Herbie Hancock, Ray Charles, Henry Mancini, Doc Severinsen, Phil Woods, and Joe Lovano.

Chris Vadala is the Director of Jazz Studies and Saxophone Professor at the University of Maryland.  Previous academic appointments include teaching studio woodwinds and conducting jazz ensembles at Connecticut College, Montgomery College, Hampton University, Prince George's Community College, and Mount Vernon College, as well as Visiting Professor of Saxophone at the Eastman School of Music, 1995 and 2001. He graduated summa cum laude from the Eastman School of Music, earning the prestigious Performers Certificate on saxophone as well as a BM in music education. He then went on to receive an MA in clarinet from Connecticut College, and pursued post graduate studies in woodwinds at Eastman.

The Chris Parker Band is comprised of four musicians: Chris Parker, pianist, Rob Thomas, electric violinist, Marko Marcinko, drummer, and Tony Marino, bassist. Thomas, Marcinko, and Marino play with several ensembles within the USA as well as internationally. 

Chris Parker has taught at SUNY Orange for over 26 years, but performs regularly locally, and in Pennsylvania and Oregon, his native state. He has been featured in the COTA Jazz Festival in Delaware Watergap, PA and the Mount Hood Jazz Festival in Portland, OR.

Chris Parker is a composer of both jazz and contemporary classical music. His original jazz compositions will be played at the concert. He received a BA from Portland State University and an MA from Goddard College. In 1990, he was the recipient of the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

This performance is supported in part by a memorial gift in honor of Dot and Don Fischbeck.

More images from the Chris Parker Band can be found here.

You also may be interested in the master class Makin’ Jazz with Chris Parker Band, featuring Chris Vadala.

A Tour of the Old World on Baroque Period Instruments

~ a concert of trios by Mosaic Ensemble: Marka Young, violin; Loretta O'Sullivan, cello; Mary Jane Corry, harpsichord

Sunday, November 22, 2009 @ 3pm
Orange Hall Theater

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Marka Young,
violin

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Loretta O'Sullivan,
cello

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Mary Jane Corry,
harpsichord

 

Admission: $8 adults; $7 alumni/faculty/staff; $6 senior citizens; free for all students; group rates

A Tour of the Old World

--on Baroque Period Instruments--

~ a concert of trios by Mosaic Ensemble: Marka Young, violin; Loretta O'Sullivan, cello; Mary Jane Corry, harpsichord

On Sunday, November 22, 2009 at 3pm in Orange Hall Theatre, Orange County Community College,  Marka Young (violin) and Mary Jane Corry (harpsichord) team up with Loretta O’Sullivan (cello), a fine musician who the New York Times states “is an agile, eloquent player.” Together they form the Mosaic Ensemble  and will play a concert of trios by composers from Italy, Austria, France, Scotland, and Germany. They will use instruments made during the Baroque period.

Marka Young regularly plays with the Hudson Valley Philharmonic and also with Rebel Baroque Orchestra in NYC, and has performed in the Blossom Festival, the Bach Aria Festival, the Connecticut Early Music Festival, and the New England Bach Festival. Loretta O'Sullivan has played in the Mostly Mozart Festival, on the Great Performers series at Lincoln Center, and at Kennedy Center, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Merkin Concert Hall, and the New York Historical Society. Young and O’Sullivan play together with NY Collegium and Concert Royal. Mary Jane Corry performs with La Grande Ecurie, the Caledonia Chamber Ensemble, the Lyric Trio, the Woodstock Chamber Orchestra, the Hudson Valley Philharmonic and at Bachfest in the Hudson Valley, and with the Albany Symphony.

This performance is supported in part by a memorial gift in honor of Dot and Don Fischbeck.

Tickets are available a the George F. Shepard Student Center, Students Activities Dept, Monday through Thursday 9am to 7:30pm and on Friday till 4:30 through November 20 and at the box office in Orange Hall beginning at 2pm on the day of the performance, November 22. They are priced at $8 adults; $7 alumni/faculty/staff; $6 senior citizens; free for all students; group rates.

Orange Hall, which is ADA compliant, is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

This is a Cultural Affairs event. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

You may also be interested in the master class Improvisation during the Baroque Era on Period Instruments being held Wednesday, November 18, 2009.

LECTURES

*Part of the lecture series "Professional Theatre in America"

†Part of the lecture series "Historic Orange County Architecture"

On Fateful Waters

Where New Worlds Meet Old Ambitions

Tuesday, February 10, 2009 @ 7pm
Assembly Room 221, Newburgh Campus --One Washington Center

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Robert Spiegelman, PhD

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

On Fateful Waters: Where New Worlds Meet Old Ambitions

by Robert Spiegelman, PhD

Sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities

The Newburgh campus of Orange County Community College at One Washington Center is the venue of a lecture presentation on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 at 7pm. Entitled On Fateful Waters: Where New Worlds Meet Old Ambitions, Dr. Robert Spiegelman puts history and motivation into perspective in a lecture rich with examples and his excitement for the subject.

Famed explorers Henry Hudson and Samuel de Champlain and acclaimed inventor Robert Fulton are luminaries of North American and New York history. These adventurers braved and entered the “unknown” – respective realms of forests, waterways, and native peoples – propelling and enacting their visions of a “New World.” As New York launches its gala 400th and 200th Anniversary Celebration, Robert Spiegelman, PhD asks whether this is just a great excuse for a year-long party. And, if so, what is it? Searching for answers, he offers a multimedia presentation to explore what is being celebrated, what might get overlooked, and what this convergence of voyages might mean for us today.

Hudson and Champlain’s journeys have traditionally been cast as heroic “voyages of discovery.” By putting a potentially strategic region on Europe’s map, Hudson would forever stamp his name into the New York/New Netherland landscape. Champlain’s efforts anointed him as the “Father of New France.” Fulton’s Steamboat would so challenge wind-and-tide, so shrink space-and-time that his so-called “Folly” became young America’s leading icon. All three were carriers of powerful passions—Discovery, Settlement, Westward Expansion, and Prosperity.

Dr. Spiegelman talks about Hudson’s complex encounters with Lenape groups, helps the audience rediscover Champlain’s rivalry with the Iroquois Six Nations in his struggle to win a Fur-Trade Empire for Old France, and also touches on the impact of Fulton’s vision – “Steam Commerce” – on native peoples and nature, and on Manhattan’s climb to global prominence.

While regarding these trips as dramatic adventures, Dr. Spiegelman uses remarkable excerpts from their journals as revealing windows on the early encounters between Europeans and indigenous “New Yorkers.” Attendees will better understand the fateful dance of progress and nature that continues to shape the environmental crossroads today.

Robert Spiegelman is President, Real-View Media, LLC. He is a sociologist, multimedia artist, writer, and a college instructor. He holds a Doctorate in Sociology from CUNY Graduate Center.

This Lyceum lecture is sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities and is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

Hanging Captain Gordon

The Government, Lincoln, and the Slave Trade

Thursday, February 12, 2009 @ 7pm
Gilman Center for International Education

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Ron Soodalter

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Book cover:
Hanging Captain Gordon

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

Hanging Captain Gordon: The Government, Lincoln, and the Slave Trade by Ron Soodalter, author, artist

Sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities.

On February 12 at 7pm, Lecturer Ron Soodalter of Chappaqua will make a presentation on Nathaniel Gordon and the slave trade and Lincoln.  Therefore, it seems appropriate to have this program on Abraham Lincoln’s birthday.  The lecture is entitled, Hanging Captain Gordon: The Government, Lincoln, and the Slave Trade.

Despite having passed a series of stringent laws banning the Atlantic slave trade, the U.S. government did nothing to enforce them, from the presidency of George Washington to the Civil War. Finally, one man--a young slave ship captain and family man from Portland, Maine, Captain Nathaniel Gordon--faced the gallows, and it fell to Abraham Lincoln to either pardon or hang him. The presentation examines the reasons behind the laws, and America’s shameful negligence in enforcing them, in the context of the horrors of the African trade. Fortunes were made through trafficking in “black gold,” while millions suffered, until the election of the one man who was resolved to put an end to the traffic once and for all. With thousands pressuring him to pardon the slaver, and thousands more seeking the man’s death, Lincoln was forced to make a hard decision.

Ron Soodalter is an author, an artist, a flamenco guitarist, and a former teacher and museum curator. He has a BA in History, Boston University, an MA in Education, NYU, and an MA in American Folk Culture from SUNY Oneonta at Cooperstown. His book, Hanging Captain Gordon: the Life & Trial of an American Slave Trader, is published by Simon & Schuster.

This Lyceum lecture is sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities and is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

Managing a Small Professional Theatre

This lecture is the third in the series Professional Theatre in America

Wednesday, February 18, 2009 @ 7pm
Orange Hall Theater

Photo: Description Follows

Brendan Burke,
Producing Artistic Director,
Shadowland Theatre,
BA in Theater Arts,
SUNY Geneseo
actor, director

Shadowland Theatre Logo containing text: Ellenville, New York 12428

~ Professional Theatre in America ~

A specialized series of lectures within the Lyceum Lecture Series which will be offered during the 2008-2009 academic year. This lecture is the third in the series.

Brendan Burke, BA in Theater Arts, SUNY Geneseo, is the Producing Artistic Director of the Shadowland Theatre.

Question: Is there a place in your life for theatre?

Find out by coming to a lecture with PowerPoint presented by Brendan Burke.

He will also cover the following:

  • The importance of theatre and its relevancy in the 21st C
  • Theatre survival in the current economy
  • The structure of a non-profit professional theatre
  • Producing a show ~ the trip from paper to stage
  • Forming and following a mission statement
  • Finding an audience and having a subscription base
  • A definition of a small professional theatre
  • The job of an Artistic Director

Brendan Burke, stalwart paterfamilias and anxious mother hen of Shadowland, admits that it's tough to keep dreams alive on a modest budget -- especially in an era when people are more likely to choose Xboxes, iPods or Blu-Rays as their preferred entertainment.

But as a longtime actor and director, he remains a stubborn, wistful keeper of the faith. For the fourth season, Burke will lure acolytes to his temple with a shrewd combination of genial shows for the senior citizens over the border in Sullivan County and tougher material for younger people who usually attend Manhattan dramas, hoping to be unmoored.

~ excerpt from "Shadowland Theatre" by Jay Blotcher in Roll Magazine: Creative Living in the Hudson Valley; May 2008

Admission: The lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

More images related to this lecture can be found here.

The Ambiguous Character of the Underground Railroad: The Agency of Black People in the South and the Hudson Valley

~ a lecture with PowerPoint by Frederick Douglass Opie, PhD

Tuesday, February 24, 2009 @ 7pm
Gilman Center for International Education

Photo: Description follows

Frederick Douglass Opie, PhD

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

The Underground Railroad has been an interesting historical phenomenon that aided thousands of African-American slaves to gain freedom. It was, indeed, a “Freedom Trail,” a vast network of people who helped fugitive slaves escape to the North free states and to Canada, by giving safe-havens along the way.

The presentation will cover:

  • the “Freedom Trail”
  • the experience of enslaved people during the antebellum period
  • views of African-Americans in free states like New York
  • various attitudes in the Hudson Valley about African-Americans before the Civil War
  • the profile of the typical runaway
  • challenges runways faced

Frederick Douglass Opie received a BS in Education, and a PhD in History from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University. His interest has led him to research African Diaspora History–the capturing of  Africans and their enslavement and dispersal through the New World. In addition, he is an accomplished athlete having been on the 1990 United States Men’s National Lacrosse Team and been inducted into The Hudson Valley Lacrosse Hall of Fame. His position at Marist College is Associate Professor of History and Director of the African Diaspora Program in the School of Liberal Arts. Before earning his doctorate degree, he was public school teacher at the elementary and high school levels, and an instructor at Morehouse College in Atlanta.

Books authored by Dr. Opie

  • HOG AND HOMINY: Soul Food from Africa to America (Columbia University Press, 2008)
  • Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala, 1882-1923 (University of Florida Press, 2009)
  • Black and Latino Relations in New York, 1959-2008.  –forthcoming-- (Columbia University Press)

Cooling Mother Earth

New York's Footprint in Nature, Then and Now

Wednesday, March 4, 2009 @ 7pm
Gilman Center for International Education

Photo: Description follows

Robert Spiegelman, PhD

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

Sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities

“Are New Yorkers stewards of nature or lords of nature?” During this vivid lecture/multimedia presentation entitled Cooling Mother Earth: New York's Footprint in Nature, Then and Now, Robert Spiegelman, PhD probes the question by revisiting key moments in the Empire State’s development history—especially its Indian, Infrastructure, and Conservation legacies. He then links them to today’s environmental crises. To find answers, Dr. Spiegelman unearths the hidden roots of New Yorkers’ conflicting views of nature, development and civilization—both then and now. Accordingly, the presentation highlights some key links among New York’s indigenous, development, and environmental histories. The first encounters of explorers and settlers with the Iroquois of central New York and the Delaware-Lenape of the Hudson Valley will be discussed alongwith core beliefs and urgent warnings of New York’s great forgotten Naturalists.

Robert Spiegelman is President, Real-View Media, LLC. He is a sociologist, multimedia artist, writer, and a college instructor. He holds a Doctorate in Sociology from CUNY Graduate Center and lives in NYC.

This Lyceum lecture is sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities and is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

The Shuberts Present: 108 Years of American Theatre

This lecture is the Fourth in the series Professional Theatre in America

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 @ 7pm
Orange Hall Theater

Photo: Description Follows

Reagan Fletcher,
archivist, theatre historian

Logo: Shubert Lyceum Theatre Facade

~ Professional Theatre in America ~

A specialized series of lectures within the Lyceum Lecture Series which will be offered during the 2008-2009 academic year. This lecture is the fourth in the series.

The Shuberts Present: 108 Years of American Theatre by Reagan Fletcher, archivist, theatre historian, adjunct faculty at Brooklyn College, BS Ed, Lubbock Christian University, MFA, Texas Tech University, Post-graduate studies, NYU, Tisch School of the Arts

Here are some of the topics to be addressed~

  • The Shuberts Present: America’s largest and oldest theatrical dynasty—now in its second century
  • The Boys from Syracuse:  Sam, Lee, and J.J. Shubert
  • The Shubert Organization:  its history and its future
  • The Shubert Foundation: second only to the NEA in grants to the Arts
  • The Shubert Archive: the collection and its treasures

Admission: The lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

More images related to this lecture can be found here.

Geo-Thermal Heating & Cooling

~ Using the Earth to Save the Earth

Tuesday, March 31, 2009 @ 7pm
Gilman Center for International Education

Photo: Description follows

Warren Allmon, PhD

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

Geo-Thermal Heating & Cooling  ~ Using the Earth to Save the Earth by Warren Allmon, PhD

This lecture fulfills a PDH/CEU (Professional Development Hour/Continuing Education Unit)

As Director of the Museum of the Earth, Ithaca, NY, Dr. Allmon has first-hand, daily knowledge and experience, as the museum building is a fine example of geo-thermal heating and cooling.

The lecture presentation will cover:

  • the development and future of geo-thermal systems for heating and cooling
  • assessing the advantages and challenges associated with harnessing energy from the Earth
  • a comparison of different types of systems around the world
  • the system installed at the Museum of the Earth/Paleontological Research Institution

Warren D. Allmon, PhD, is the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution and the founder and developer of the Museum of the Earth. He is the Hunter R. Rawlings III Professor of Paleontology at Cornell University. Dr. Allmon received his BA in Geology from Dartmouth College and his PhD in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Harvard University.

His research specialties include the systematics of Cenozoic gastropods and the interaction between ecology and macro-evolution, particularly speciation and bio-diversity.

Click here for a larger version of the photograph.

Writers 4 Writers: The Dramatists Guild in the 21st Century: The future of the American Playwright: Past as Prologue

This is the Fifth and Final lecture in the series Professional Theatre in America

Wednesday, April 1, 2009 @ 7pm
Orange Hall Theater

Photo: Description Follows

Ralph Sevush, JD

Photo: Description Follows

Roland Tec, MMus

Logo: Dramatists Guild of America

~ Professional Theatre in America ~

A specialized series of lectures within the Lyceum Lecture Series which will be offered during the 2008-2009 academic year. This lecture is the fourth in the series.

The challenges facing the playwright in the 21st century is the topic to be discussed on Wednesday, April 1, 2009 when two representatives of the Dramatists Guild of America, come to Orange Hall Theater. The lecture entitled 

Writers 4 Writers: The Dramatists Guild in the 21st Century: ~the future of the American Playwright: Past as Prologue~

is scheduled for 7pm and it is free and open to the public and no registration is necessary.

Ralph Sevush, JD and Roland Tec, MMus will speak about the role of the Guild in contemporary theatrical practice as well as the history of the 88 year old association. The audience is invited to ask questions on the subject of the Guild.

Ralph Sevush, a lawyer and Executive Director of Business Affairs at the Dramatists Guild, has been with the Guild since 1997, advising over 6000 playwrights, lyricists, and composers writing for the stage. He has a BA from SUNY Stony Brook, a JD from the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law and has been a member of the BMI/Lehman Engle Librettists Workshop since 1999.

Roland Tec has a Masters in Music Theory and has worked in film, theatre, and opera, as a director, producer, writer, and composer. Presently, he is Director of Membership at the Dramatists Guild. Mr. Tec has taught and/or lectured at several festivals and institutions, including Boston University, Brandeis University, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the 92nd Street Y, and Harvard College. He holds an AB in Music Composition from Harvard College and a Masters in Music Theory and Composition from Brandeis University.

It is the mission of the Dramatists Guild to “ensure that the voice of the playwright will continue to be heard loudly, clearly, and without compromise.” In other words, the Guild is “dedicated to protecting, informing, and promoting the interests of dramatists everywhere.”

Green Building & Ground Source Heat Exchange

~ a lecture with PowerPoint presentation

Tuesday, October 6, 2009 @ 7:15pm
Hall 111 Film Theatre/Lecture Hall

Photo: Description follows

Joseph Hurwitz
Principal – A.I.A.Joseph Hurwitz & Associates ~ Architects

Photo: Description follows

Randolph N. Horner
renewable energy project developer

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

Green Building & Ground Source Heat Exchange

a presentation by Joseph Hurwitz, Principal – A.I.A.Joseph Hurwitz & Associates ~ Architects, and Randolph N. Horner, renewable energy project developer

Sustainability is more than a popular term. It is a real focus that municipalities and individuals are working toward in order to make sure that energy sources do not cease and the earth’s resources are not stripped.

When the Town of Esopus in Ulster County decided to build a new Town Hall, ‘green’ technology was the decided approach. Joseph Hurwitz, Principal in A.I.A.Joseph Hurwitz & Associates ~ Architects and Randolph N. Horner, renewable energy project developer, were chosen to come up with the plans. What subsequently was built is now being hailed by some as a model for other counties and states to study and imitate.

Not only is the building heated and cooled geo-thermally, the building’s design maximizes the ability to use natural light. The onsite generation of solar power is employed through the efforts of Randolph N. Horner who is also behind a drive to reduce the net carbon dioxide emissions of Woodstock, NY to zero in 10 years.

On Tuesday, October 6, 2009 at 7:15pm Architect/Contractor Joseph Hurwitz and Renewable Energy Developer Randolph N. Horner will give a lecture with PowerPoint presentation about Green Building & Ground Source Heat Exchange that will be both informative and practical.

This lecture presentation is sponsored by Paul Sweetman.

Architects and engineers in attendance will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU.

Bio Fuel

~ a panel

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 @ 7:30pm
Hall 111 Film Theatre/Lecture Hall

Photo: Description follows

Larry R. Hulle, MPS, Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County Dairy, Field Crop & Farm Business Management Educator

Photo: Description follows

John Brown, Bio-energy advocate & demonstration farmer, Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County Agriculture Advisory Committee member, NRCS Earth Team Volunteer

Photo: Description follows

Libby Murphy, Project Manager, Hudson Valley Grass Energy Mobile Pelleter Project, Lower Hudson-Long Island Resource Conservation & Development Council

Photo: Description follows

Jerry Robock, President, Community Biofuels

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

This program is sponsored by Paul Sweetman.

Bio Fuel ~ a panel

Want to find out about alternative fuels? These means of cost-cutting the heating of buildings and running motors vehicles are real and available. Here is an opportunity for you to learn how to apply the use of Bio Fuels to make it less costly to heat your homes and run your automobiles.

Entitled Bio Fuel ~ panel, it is scheduled on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 at 7:30pm in Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre/Lecture Hall.

Harriman Hall is located at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY.

Four experts will offer different perspectives and share their knowledge and experience.

Larry R. Hulle, Dairy, Field Crop & Farm Business Management Educator at Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County, will moderate the discussion.

John Brown, Bio-energy advocate, demonstration farmer and a member of the Cornel Extension Agriculture Advisory Committee, is one of the panelists who will focus on his initial interest in farming for energy and some of the reasons why he believes that grass pellets are a good choice from a farmers perspective.

Libby Murphy, Project Manager, Hudson Valley Grass Energy Mobile Pelleter Project, Lower Hudson-Long Island Resource Conservation & Development Council, will explain the mobile pelleter and Biomass Heating Systems with native Hudson Valley grasses.

Jerry Robock, President, Community Biofuels, will talk about bio-derived products such as biodiesel and bioheating oil.

This panel lecture discussion with PowerPoint is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

Attendance at this panel presentation offers PDH-CEU to engineers and architects.

New York City as "Jerusalem on the Hudson"

The Spiritual Legacy of the Hudson River School of Painters

Tuesday, October 20 , 2009 @ 8pm
Cafeteria of the Tower Building on the Newburgh Campus

Photo: Description follows

Ronald Brown, PhD

Photo: Description follows

The Destruction of the Empire by Thomas Cole;
the fourth of five paintings in the Course of the Empire series.

Click here for a larger version of this image.

Admission: free and open to the public and no registration is required

The Hudson River School is the topic of a lecture to be given on Tuesday, October 20 at 7pm in the Cafeteria of the Tower Building on the Newburgh Campus.

Ronald Brown, PhD will present a lecture with PowerPoint entitled

New York City as "Jerusalem on the Hudson:"
The Spiritual Legacy of the Hudson River School of Painters
.

This presentation will chronicle the spiritual impact of Thomas Cole (1801-1848), the father of the Hudson River School of painting, on the emergence of New York City as the Empire City. Dr. Brown will demonstrate how Cole believed that the mountains, lakes, rivers, valleys, panoramas, and farm land of the Hudson Valley possessed a transformative power that could and would blend the Dutch and English, and hosts of later immigrants into a new civilization. Dr. Brown will explain this with the use of the majestic five-painting series, The Course of Empire of the 1830s. Additionally, other Hudson River School painters; Olmstead and Vaux's Central and Prospect parks; and the system of parkways, tunnels, and bridges of Robert Moses will be brought into the discussion.

This lecture presentation, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the New York Council for the Humanities, Speakers in the Humanities.

Questions may be directed to (845) 341-4891 or (845) 562-2454

Dr. Brown holds degrees from Gannon University (Erie, PA), The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Harvard Divinity School, and the University of Geneva (Switzerland).

He is the author of two books:

  • A Religious History of Flushing, Queens
  • A Religious History of African-American Harlem

And he is currently completing: The Myth of New York as the Empire City; A Religious History of Lower Manhattan

Military Grandeur ~ Historic Buildings at USMA, West Point

A lecture with PowerPoint by Stephen Grove, PhD

Tuesday, October 27, 2009 @ 7pm
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description Follows

First Division of Barracks
(photo by Virgina Moore)

Photo: Description Follows

Stephen Grove, PhD, USMA Historian, Retired

This is the first of four lectures in the series “Historic Orange County Architecture.”

This lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

Military Grandeur ~ Historic Buildings at USMA, West Point

(a virtual tour with explanation)

A lecture with PowerPoint by Stephen Grove, PhD, USMA Historian, Retired

Architects and engineers in attendance will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

More images related to the lecture can be found here.

You may also be interested in the exhibit Historic Orange County  Architecture, which will be on view October 25 ~ December 16, 2009.

How to Build a Mansion ~ The Webb Horton–Morrison Hall Mansion Construction

A lecture with PowerPoint by Professor Mary Ann Van Benschoten

Wednesday, November 4, 2009 @ 7pm
Morrison Hall Mansion

Photo: Description Follows

Color photograph of Morrison Hall,
the Webb Horton mansion,
architecture style: Chateau/Romanesque Revival.
The photograph was taken by Andrew Komonchak.

Photo: Description Follows

Mary Ann Van Benschoten

This is the second of four lectures in the series “Historic Orange County Architecture.”

This lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

How to Build a Mansion ~ The Webb Horton–Morrison Hall Mansion Construction is the title of the second lecture in the Historic Orange County Architecture Lecture Series presented by Cultural Affairs at SUNY Orange County Community College. The lecture with PowerPoint is being given by Professor Mary Ann Van Benschoten who is the Archival Librarian at SUNY Orange. The setting for the lecture presentation is the mansion itself—Morrison Hall—which is ADA compliant and located at 115 South Street, Middletown. Wednesday, November 4, 2009 at 7pm is the day/date and time of this program which is free and open to the public.

Webb Horton was a self-made man and like so many wealthy people of the Gilded Age he demonstrated publicly his wealth by constructing a superior private residence. This lecture is about the extreme measures Webb and his son Eugene took in order to build the mansion on South Street. Professor Van Benschoten will explain how the house was made to be totally fireproof. Also, she will tell about the many houses that were moved in order to create the park-like setting that made up the estate surrounding the mansion and its accompanying buildings, and which now is the campus of SUNY Orange. Two other interesting points in the lecture will be the type of stone used and the special quarry which was opened in upstate New York to mine the marble specially for the mansion.

Architects and engineers in attendance will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU.

Also, tours of the mansion will be given by Sharon Cosgrove at 6:25pm and immediately following the lecture.

You may also be interested in the exhibit Historic Orange County  Architecture, which will be on view October 25 ~ December 16, 2009.

The Grand Period ~ Architectural Artistry, Post-Civil War to the Great Depression

A lecture by Michael Bertolini

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 @ 7pm
Orange Hall Gallery

Photo: Description follows

Michael Bertolini

This is the third of four lectures in the series “Historic Orange County Architecture.”

This lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

The third lecture in the Historic Orange County Architecture Lecture Series presented by Cultural Affairs at SUNY Orange County Community College is scheduled for 7pm on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 in Orange Hall Gallery. Orange Hall is ADA compliant and located at the corner of Grandview and Wawayanda Avenues, Middletown. The setting for the lecture is within the exhibit space of the nearly 100 paintings, pen & inks, and photographs of the Historic Orange County Architecture show.

Entitled The Grand Period ~ Architectural Artistry, Post-Civil War to the Great Depression, the lecture details the design of the grand houses and their varied architectural styles. In addition, the individuals who had them built will be mentioned. In that context, the transportation which brought these wealthy individuals to Orange County and why they came will also be examined.

The presenter on Tuesday evening will be Michael Bertolini of Warwick who actually lives in a museum—the 1810 Azariah Ketchum House on Warwick’s Church Street. The house is of Federal style and is owned by Warwick Historical Society of which he is Curator. Michael Bertolini, who was mentored by New York decorators Billy Baldwin and James Amster, is also Chair of Warwick’s Architectural Review Board. He has been an International Design Consultant and for decades, the owner and proprietor of The Red Shutters, an interior design, antiques, and accessories business.

Architects and engineers in attendance will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU.

You may also be interested in the exhibit Historic Orange County  Architecture, which will be on view October 25 ~ December 16, 2009.

What's in A Name? Explaining the Recent Disputes among Satmar and Bobover Hasidim America

~ lecture by Samuel Heilman, PhD

Monday, November 16, 2009 @ 7pm
Orange Hall Theatre

Photo: Description follows

Samuel Heilman, PhD

This lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

What's in A Name? Explaining the Recent Disputes among Satmar and Bobover Hasidim America is the title of the lecture to be presented by Samuel Heilman, PhD at 7pm on Monday, November 16, 2009 in Orange Hall Theatre, Orange County Community College.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and located at the corner of Grandview and Wawayanda Avenues, Middletown. This lecture presentation is part of the 2009 Fall Lecture series of the Lyceum Series of Events.

Samuel Heilman holds the Harold Proshansky Chair in Jewish Studies at the Graduate Center CUNY and is the Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Queens College of CUNY. A graduate of Brandeis University, he received an MA from New School University and a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. In Fall 2008, he was selected as a Fulbright Senior Specialist and sent to the People’s Republic of China where he lectured at Nanjing, Henan, and Shanghai Universities. He has received numerous awards among which is the Marshall Sklare Memorial Award in 2004 for his lifetime of scholarship from the Association for the Social Scientific Study of Jewry.

In 2007-2008, he was a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Jerusalem. He has also been Scheinbrun Visiting Professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, visiting professor of social anthropology at Tel Aviv University, and a Fulbright visiting professor at the Universities of New South Wales and Melbourne in Australia. He has been a guest lecturer at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, U.C.L. A., Rutgers University, Harvard University, the University of Maryland, Carelton College, Sydney University, Spertus College, the University of Pennsylvania, and Brandeis University, among others. He has been a guest lecturer at Chonnam University in Gwangju, South Korea. He has given the Rosen Lecture at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, the Michaelson Lecture at the University of California at Santa Barbara (2008) and the Stroum Lectures at the University of Washington (1993). He is a frequent contributor to newspapers and magazines. Receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, he wrote his thesis under the direction of Erving Goffman, about whom he was recently interviewed.

Awards:

In 2004, Heilman won the Marshall Sklare Memorial Award for his lifetime of scholarship from the Association for the Social Scientific Study of Jewry; he also was awarded the highest university rank of Distinguished Professor of Sociology by the City University of New York. His book, The Gate Behind the Wall was honored with the Present Tense Magazine Literary Award for the best book of 1984 in the “Religious Thought” category. A Walker in Jerusalem received the National Jewish Book Award for 1987 and Defenders of the Faith was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award for 1992. Portrait of American Jewry: The Last Half of the 20th Century was honored with the 1996 [first] Gratz College Tuttleman Library Centennial Award. When a Jew Dies won both the Koret Award in 2003 and the National Jewish Book Award in 2004. Heilman is also recipient of fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, and the Mellon Foundation. He received a Distinguished Faculty Award from the City University of New York in 1985 and 1987. He is listed in Who’s Who in the East, Contemporary Authors and Who’s Who in World Jewry. He has been a member of the board of the Association for Jewish Studies and the YIVO Annual and the Max Weinreich Center.

Dr. Heilman is the author of numerous articles, reviews, and columns as well as eleven books:

  • Synagogue Life: A Study in Symbolic Interaction
  • The People of the Book: Drama, Fellowship and Religion
  • The Gate Behind the Wall
  • A Walker in Jerusalem
  • Defenders of the Faith: Inside Ultra-Orthodox Jewry
  • Portrait of American Jews: The Last Half of the 20th Century
  • When a Jew Dies: The Ethnography of a Bereaved Son
  • Death, Bereavement, & Mourning--What We Have Learned after 9/11
  • Sliding to the Right: The Contest for the Future of American Jewish Orthodoxy
  • Cosmopolitans and Parochials: Modern Orthodox Jews in America (co-authored with Steven M. Cohen).
  • The Rebbe: The Man Behind the Lubavitcher Hasidim [co-authored with Menachem Friedman ](In Press)

He is also editor of the Death, Bereavement, and Mourning and Editor-in-Chief of Contemporary Jewry.

Stories & Columns

  • 2001 - “Still Seeing the Rebbe: Pilgrims at the Lubavitcher Grand Rabbi’s Grave in Queens” in Killing the Buddha , September, 2001 an online magazine.

1993 to present – A bi-weekly sociological column in the New York Jewish Week; the column is entitled “Looking In.”

  • 1994 – “Why Be Jewish, part 2,” Moment, February 1994, pp. 18-19, 71
  • 1994 – “The Lubavitcher Rebbe’s Century,” The Jewish Forward, June 15.
  • 1992 – “Why Be Jewish,” Moment, December, pp. 37-39
  • 1992 – “Down and Out in the 90’s: Orthodox Jews in the U.S. Facing Serious Financial Difficulties,” Baltimore Jewish Times, October 2, pp. 64-66.
  • 1992 – “Lumet vs. Reality: A Movie Revue” July 31, The Jewish Forward, p. 9.
  • 1983 – “There are Two Clocks in the House of Study,” Moment (October) 1983, vol. 8, #9, pp. 50-58.
  • 1986 – “A Man of Great Consequence,” Inside Magazine, Winter

Journal Articles

  • 2007 “Jews and Fundamentalism” Journal of Ecumenical Studies vol. 42, no. 1, Winter, 2007, pp. 29-41.
  • 2005 “How Did Fundamentalism Manage to Infiltrate Contemporary Orthodoxy,” The Sklare Distinguished Scholar Address Contemporary Jewry v. 25, pp. 258-272
  • 2005 “Jews and Fundamentalism.” Jewish Political Studies Review. 17:1-2 (Spring).
  • 2004 “American Jews and Community: A Spectrum of Possibilities,” Contemporary Jewry vol. 24, pp. 51-69.
  • 2002 “The Importance of Residence: Goldscheider’s Contribution to Explaining Orthodoxy’s Vitality,” in Contemporary Jewry vol 23, pp. 220-236.
  • 2000 “All In Faith: Religion as the Idiom and Means of Coping with Distress.” Co-authored with Eliezer Witztum in Mental Health, Religion and Culture. 3:115-124.
  • 2000 “Ethnography and Biography. Or What Happened When I Asked People to Tell Me the Story of their Lives as Jews,” in Contemporary Jewry v. 21, pp. 23-32.
  • 1999 “Separated But Not Divorced [Israel and American Jewry]” Society v. 36 no. 4 (May 1999) p. 8-14
  • 1997 “Passing on the Message: Children and Synagogue Life,” in Jewish Identity and Religious Commitment: The North American Study of Conservative Synagogues and Their Members, 1995-96, Jack Wertheimer, editor, pp.24-28.
  • 1997 “Value-Sensitive Therapy: Learning from Ultra-Orthodox Patients” (co-authored with Eliezer Witztum) in Journal of American Psychotherapy Volume 51, No. 4 Fall, pp. 522-541.
  • 1997 “Are There Jewish Fundamentalists?” in Culturefront vol. 5, No. 3/Vol. 6, N. 1 Winter, pp. 76-79.
  • 1996 “The Religious Battle for Israel,” Occasional Paper Center on Violence and Human Survival John Jay College of Criminal Justice, October.
  • 1996 “Religion and Violence in Israel,” Muslim Politics Report Council on Foreign Relations, Number 5, January/February.
  • 1995 “The Religious Battle For Israel.” The Christian Century v. 112 (December 20-27 1995) p. 1242-5
  • 1994 “Patients, Chaperons and Healers: Enlarging the Therapeutic Encounter,” (co-authored with Eliezer Witztum) in Social Science & Medicine, vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 133-143.
  • 1993 “American Jews and Moral Education,” in Proceedings of the Principals Council, Solomon Schechter Association, pp. 20-32.
  • 1991 “Recent Studies of the American Synagogue: A Review Essay,” in Religious Studies Review, vol. 17 #3 (July), pp. 197-200.
  • 1986 “In Search of the Present: Synagogue Ethnography,” Conservative Judaism, vol 38, no. 2 (Winter) 1985-86, pp. 56-66.
  • 1985 “Jews in the Land of Promise“ Review essay on A Certain People: American Jews And Their Lives Today by Charles Silberman in The New Leader (October) 1985.
  • 1982 “The Sociology of American Jewry: The Last Ten Years,” Annual Review Of Sociology (October) 1982, vol 8, pp. 135-160.
  • 1982 “The Conservative Synagogue in Contemporary America,” National Jewish Resource Center Publications, 1982, 16 pp.
  • 1982 “Prayer and the Orthodox Synagogue: An Analysis of Ritual Display,” Contemporary Jewry, Spring/Summer 1982, v. 6,#1, pp. 1-17.
  • 1982 “The Many Faces of Orthodoxy, Part I,” Modern Judaism (February) 1982, vol. 2 pp. 23-51.
  • 1982 “The Many Faces of Orthodoxy, Part II,” Modern Judaism (May) 1982, vol. 2, pp.171-198.
  • 1980 “Jewish Sociologist: Native-as-Stranger,” The American Sociologist, (May) 1980, vol. 15, #2, pp. 100-108.
  • 1979 “Communication and Interaction: A Parallel in the Theoretical Outlooks of Erving Goffman and Ray Birdwhistell,” Communicatio, 1979, vol. 4, #2, pp.221-234.
  • 1978 “On Training Natives to be Strangers,” Jewish Folklore & Ethnology Newsletter, 1978, vol. 1 (4), PP.16-17.
  • 1977 “Inner and Outer Identity: Sociological Ambivalence Among Orthodox Jews,” Jewish Social Studies, (Summer) 1977, vol. 39, #3, pp.227-240.
  • 1976 “Reflections of a Moral Marrano,” Response: A Contemporary Jewish Review (September) 1976, pp. 155-162.
  • 1975 “The Gift of Alms: Face-to-Face Almsgiving among Orthodox Jews,” Urban Life And Culture (January)
  • 1975, vol. 3, #4, pp.371-395 (reprinted in Peter Rose [ed] The Study Of Society [4th edition] 1977).
  • 1968 “Zen Judaism,” Response: A Contemporary Jewish Review, (Fall) 1968, vol. 2, #2, pp.3-16.

Historic Preservation of Orange County Architecture

A lecture with PowerPoint by Anne Coon

Thursday, November 19, 2009 @ 7:15pm
Orange Hall Gallery

These houses are examples of preserved houses in Orange County. The paintings on in the Historic Orange County Architecture exhibit.

Photo: Description Follows

Craig House
Otisville
watercolor
by Rosalind Hodgkins

Photo: Description Follows

Duthie Home
Bellvale, Town of Warwick
color photograph
by Daniel Duthie

Photo: Description Follows

Hodge House:
a Vaux/Downing Villa
Newburgh
watercolor
by Mary Evelyn Whitehill

Photo: Description Follows

Anne Coon

This is the fourth of four lectures in the series “Historic Orange County Architecture.”

This lecture is free and open to the public and no registration is required.

The fourth lecture in the Historic Orange County Architecture Lecture Series presented by Cultural Affairs at SUNY Orange County Community College is scheduled for 7:15pm on Thursday, November 19, 2009 in Orange Hall Gallery. Orange Hall is ADA compliant and located at the corner of Grandview and Wawayanda Avenues, Middletown.

Entitled Historic Preservation of Orange County Architecture, the lecture details the many styles of architecture represented in houses and public buildings in Orange County. In addition, the rationale for construction of these buildings in the first place, and their survival into the 21st Century will be discussed. The lecture with PowerPoint is being given by Anne Coon who is Chair of the Curatorial Committee of the Historical Society of Newburgh Bay and the Highlands. Through this lecture presentation, Anne Coon wants to prove why, “Preservation pays off.”

The venue for the lecture is purposefully set within the exhibit space of the Historic Orange County Architecture show which is comprised of nearly 100 paintings, pen & inks, and photographs of buildings of significance which depict many different architectural styles in Orange County.

Architects and engineers in attendance will receive a certificate for one PDH-CEU.

You may also be interested in the exhibit Historic Orange County  Architecture, which will be on view October 25 ~ December 16, 2009.

MASTER CLASSES/WORKSHOPS

The Creation of Hybrid Instruments

Their Art and Sound by Ken Butler ~ a master class

Friday, January 30, 2009 @ 12noon
Orange Hall, Room 23

Photo: description follows

Ken Butler

Admission is free.

In addition to the master class, Ken Butler will give a free concert on his hybrid instruments accompanied by percussionist Bill Buchen and bassist Roger Lipson. The concert, which is entitled Voices of Anxious Objects  is scheduled for Friday, January 30, 2009 at 7:30pm.

Ken Butler studied viola as a child and maintained an interest in music while studying visual arts in France, at Colorado College (BA in studio art), and Portland State University where he completed his MFA in painting. He has performed with John Zorn, Laurie Anderson, Butch Morris, The Soldier String Quartet, The Tonight Show Band, and The Master Gnawa musicians of Morocco. His CD, Voices of Anxious Objects is on Zorn's Tzadik label.

More images related to the master class can be found here.

For related events, click here.

Experiencing Musics of the World

with Hector Martignon ~ a master class

Friday, February 20, 2009 @ 12noon
Orange Hall, Room 23

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Hector Martignon

Admission is free. This event is open to the public and no registration is required.

Hector Martignon will present a free master class from noon to 1:30pm in Orange Hall, Room 23, on Experiencing Musics of the World. No registration is required, and the public is invited.

In addition, Hector Martignon and his ensemble, Foreign Affair will present a concert of Latin, Brazilian, and World Jazz in Orange Hall Theater on Friday, February 20, 2009 at 8pm.

Hector Martignon was pianist for the late Ray Barretto's various ensembles. During his eight-year association with Barretto, his contributions as pianist, arranger, and composer were fundamental in shaping the sound of the now famous New World Spirit Sextet. One of his last collaborations with Barretto, "My Summertime," was a favorite nominee for a Grammy award. His versatility has also made him extremely active in the film and television industries. Besides playing all piano parts, he arranged and produced many parts of the score for the Oscar-nominated film Eat, Drink, Man, Woman by Ang Lee and performed the piano and keyboard parts for the movie scores Gloria and Relativity. He is composer of the original music of Septimo Cielo, which won international prizes. He also collaborated in the production of many Broadway musicals (Chronicle of a Death Foretold, The Capeman, Selena Forever) as conductor, arranger, and co-composer.

Hector Martignon has a varied background of musical genres and plays both classical music as well as jazz. He is on the faculty of Lucy Moses School of Music and the Special Music School at the renowned Kaufman Center, NYC

More images related to the master class can be found here.

Creating a Play by playwright/actor Mel England

~ a workshop/master class

Thursday, April 2, 2009 @ 2-4pm
Orange Hall Theater

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Mel England
playwright/actor

Admission is free. This event is open to the public and no registration is required.

Creating a Play by playwright/actor Mel England ~ a workshop/master class

Also, on Friday, April 3, at 8pm in Orange Hall Theater, Mel England will be presenting the premiere of his new play about the environment and sustainability:

Swimming with the Polar Bears
—one man confronts his powerlessness—

Mel England was a Tisch School of the Arts Trustee Scholar at NYU’s BFA Acting Program, who also studied with Stella Adler, Terry Schreiber, and with members of the Royal Shakespeare Company at the British American Theatre Institute. He  starred in the NY premiere of Israel Horovitz's one-man play about September 11th, 3 Weeks After Paradise at the Cherry Lane as well as Orange Hall Theatre in 2002. He also performed in his own one-man show Navajo Memoirs at the NY Fringe and Los Angeles.  Off-Broadway he's appeared at the Pearl Theatre in Hecuba, Misanthrope (understudy) and Marriage (understudy).  He's the recipient of the NY Fringe Festival's "Best Acting Ensemble Award" for Lucky Man, and "Best Play of the Year" in Denver for the Regional Premiere of A Shayba Naudel. He has been a part of several original New York productions, including Midsummer Night's Dream in Washington Square, Honeysuckles, developed for television by FOX, and King of Connecticut with Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

The Secret Life of Poetry by Chase Twichell, poet

~a Master Class on approaching and writing poetry, and getting published

Wednesday, April 22, 2009 @ 12noon
Gilman Center for International Education

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Chase Twichell, poet

Admission: Free & open to the public

Nationally-recognized Poet Chase Twichell is coming Earth Day–Wednesday, April 22–to give a reading of her original works and to share experiences on writing poetry and getting it published, during two events. Both presentations are free and open to the public, and no registration is required. The campus is ADA compliant.

The Secret Life of Poetry by Chase Twichell, poet ~a Master Class on approaching and writing poetry, and getting published, is scheduled to begin at noon in the Gilman Center for International Education which is located in the Library, at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue.

An Adirondack Poet–Chase Twichell ~ a Reading of her original works will take place at 7pm in Morrison Hall Mansion at 115 South Street. See this entry for more biographical information.

Chase Twichell has devoted herself to writing poetry since her early teenage years.   During her college years, she continued to write poems while studying with Richard Wilbur at Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT and Hugh Ogden at Trinity College, Hartford, CT from which she graduated with a BA in 1973. She attended Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa, where she obtained her MFA in 1976. That was a very fertile, competitive atmosphere particularly because of the diverse group of poets there at the time.

She has taught at five colleges/universities and lived in the serene cold of the Adirondacks and the warm climes of the Gulf Coast and in the islands of the Caribbean as well as New Jersey, and produced poetry relative to each environment.  She has written and published seven books of poetry and co-edited a book on the writing of poetry.

Chase Twichell has been the recipient of numerous poetry honors and has also been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Her coming on Earth Day is quite appropriate as she is concerned about this planet/this world as demonstrated in her book The Ghost of Eden, a visionary sequence of interlocking meditations on the death of nature as we know it. These poems were directly influenced by both the New Jersey and the Adirondack landscapes.

3D Stereo Digital Photography

~ a master class by Stuart Stiles, Professor Emeritus, SUNY Orange

Monday, September 14, 2009 @ 11am-12:45pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

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Professor Stuart Stiles

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Brewster lenticular stereoscope

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Holmes Bates style stereoscope

Admission is free. This event is open to the public and no registration is required.

To further one’s knowledge of stereoscopic photography, a free master class that is open to the public is being offered by Prof. Stiles on Monday, September 14, 2009 11am - 12:45pm in Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre. The audience is invited to stay after the class for further discussion.

Stereo photographer, author, publisher and educator, Prof. Stuart Stiles has organized museum exhibits using his collection of stereoscopic images, cameras, and viewers. He has written, “Stereoscopic Saratoga Springs: approaching and entering the twentieth century,” a book that takes readers/viewers on a virtual 3D tour of the resort at Saratoga Springs, New York in the Victorian era. He has conducted workshops for the Interactive Museum in Middletown, NY where children learned to create their own stereo cameras and to prepare their photographs for stereo viewing.

As a retired member of the psychology faculty at Orange County Community College, he has presented stereo photography related courses for the ENCORE program at the college. He has presented workshops and stereo theater shows at the New York Stereoscopic Society and at conventions of the National Stereoscopic Association. He has shared his digital stereo images in the Stereoscopic Society of America’s online folio. A selection of his stereo photos is included on “THE 2003 3D CD EXPO.”

After a career of thirty three years in the psychology faculty at the College, Prof. Stiles is operating a stereo photography studio as a retirement activity. He maintains a web site for the studio that links to stereoscopic related events:

http://www.pioneeris.net/sstiles

Professor Stiles has an exhibit of of stereo photography entitled Stereoscopic 3D ~ Photography with the Depth of Normal Vision on display from August 20 until September 25, 2009 in the Orange Hall Gallery Loft.

Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre is at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. It is ADA compliant.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Acting on Camera

~a Master Class by Elaine Bromka, actress

Monday, September 14, 2009 @ 4-6:45pm
Orange Hall, Room 26

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Elaine Bromka, actress
BA, Smith College
MAT, National Theatre Institute

Admission: Free, however registration is limited and required. Attendees can also come to observe, rather than participate.

Emmy Award-winning actress Elaine Bromka will give a workshop entitled Acting on Camera on Monday, September 14 from 4 to 6:45pm in Orange Hall Room 26, Orange County Community College.

Registration is limited and required. Attendees can also come to observe, rather than participate.

Ms Bromka will give individualized coaching and a camera and viewing on a television monitor will offer an on-camera experience and means of critiquing.

The workshop will show how to come across with maximum effect. Nuances of intention, voice, body language, and optimal wardrobe colors will be discussed.

In addition, Ms Bromka will demonstrate how to develop the skill of spontaneity when the camera light goes on.

Elaine Bromka has been a professional stage, television, and screen actress for over thirty years. She is a member of The Actors Studio and Ensemble Studio Theatre.

In the three genres: Film: Cindy, the mom in Uncle Buck. T.V.: Sex & the City, E.R., The Sopranos, Providence, Dharma & Greg, Law and Order, Law and Order: Special Victims' Unit and Criminal Intent, Stella Lombard on Days of our Lives, the Emmy Award-winning Playing for Time with Vanessa Redgrave and Catch a Rainbow, for which Ms. Bromka herself won an Emmy. She has appeared on Broadway—The Rose Tattoo, I'm Not Rappaport, Macbeth—and off-Broadway—Cloud 9 at the Lucille Lortel, the Roundabout's Inadmissible Evidence with Nicol Williamson, the world premiere of Michael Weller's Split at Ensemble Studio Theatre and Candide with the National Theatre of the Deaf. She has played leads at regional theaters across the country, including Long Wharf, Hartford Stage, Center Stage, Actors Theatre of Louisville, ACT/Seattle, O'Neill Playwrights Conference, Shakespeare and Company, McCarter Theatre, Pittsburgh Public Theater, and the Folger Theatre Group. Her portrayal of Shirley Valentine at the George Street Playhouse was cited as the 1997 outstanding solo performance in New Jersey by the Star Ledger. Ms. Bromka has performed her one-woman show, Lady Bird, Pat & Betty: Tea for Three, across the country—including here on the stage of Orange Hall Theatre on October 16, 2004. The impetus for that play came from her portraying the last eight First Ladies opposite Rich Little in The Presidents on tour and for P.B.S.

This program is part of the Lyceum Series of Events presented by Cultural Affairs.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu

Makin’ Jazz

~a Master Class with Chris Parker Band, featuring Chris Vadala

Friday, October 16, 2009 @ 11am
Orange Hall, Room 23

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Chris Vadala,
wind instruments

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Chris Parker, piano

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Rob Thomas, violin

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Marko Marcinko, drums

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Tony Marino, bass

Admission: Free and open to the public

On Friday, October 16 at 11am in Orange Hall Room 23, a master class entitled  Makin’ Jazz is being offered that is free and open to the public. This is an opportunity to be “up close and personal” with the masters-- the members of the Chris Parker Band plus Chris Vadala.

Chris Vadala is the Director of Jazz Studies and Saxophone Professor at the University of Maryland.  Previous academic appointments include teaching studio woodwinds and conducting jazz ensembles at Connecticut College, Montgomery College, Hampton University, Prince George's Community College, and Mount Vernon College, as well as Visiting Professor of Saxophone at the Eastman School of Music, 1995 and 2001. He graduated summa cum laude from the Eastman School of Music, earning the prestigious Performers Certificate on saxophone as well as a BM in music education. He then went on to receive an MA in clarinet from Connecticut College, and pursued post graduate studies in woodwinds at Eastman.

Chris Parker has taught at SUNY Orange for over 26 years.

He received a BA from Portland State University and an MA from Goddard College. In 1990, he was the recipient of the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

This program is part of the Lyceum Series of Events presented by Cultural Affairs.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

You may also be interested in the performance of the Chris Parker Band, featuring Chris Vadala.

Improvisation during the Baroque Era on Period Instruments

~ a master class by Marka Young, violin and Mary Jane Corry, harpsichord

Wednesday, November 18, 2009 @ 10am-11:30am
Orange Hall, Room 23

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Marka Young,
violin

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Mary Jane Corry, harpsichord

Admission: Free and open to the public and no registration is required.

You may think that improvisation started in the 20th Century with jazz or non-conventional theatre or comedy shows. Not so! Picture the 1500s-1700s with musicians jammin’. Our ancestors were pretty kool in playing music… “Improv” was alive and flourishing.

Come listen and learn how this was happening during a master class that will be given by two of the Hudson Valley’s finest musicians—Marka Young and Mary Jane Corry, who will demonstrate on their period instruments, violin and harpsichord, respectively. 

The session, which is free and open to the public, starts at 10am and continues for one and one-half hours in Orange Hall, Room 23 at Orange County Community College, Middletown on Wednesday, November 18, 2009.  No registration is required.

Orange Hall is ADA compliant and is located at the corner of Wawayanda and Grandview Avenues, Middletown, NY.

This is a Cultural Affairs event. Questions may be directed to Cultural Affairs at (845)341-4891 and cultural@sunyorange.edu.

You may also be interested in the concert A Tour of the Old World on Baroque Period Instruments being held Sunday, November 22, 2009.

POETRY

Readings & Musical Interlude

Celebrating Black Cultural History in Orange History

Sunday, February 22, 2009 @ 3pm
Morrison Hall Mansion

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Samuel Wright

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Beverly Poyerd

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Clarence and Greer Cooper

This event is also listed under Performances.

Admission: Free & open to the public

Readings & Musical Interlude: Celebrating Black Cultural History in Orange History

A Reading of Langston Hughes Poems and Writings by Samuel Wright, actor

and A Reading of Poems by James Weldon Johnson by Greer Cooper

with Musical Interlude of John Rosamond Johnson/James Weldon Johnson works by Beverly Poyerd, pianist & Clarence Cooper, EdD, tenor & Greer Cooper, alto

and Introduction on Greenwood Forest Farms by Paul Kwame Johnson

The Orange County Citizens Foundation annual exhibit Read All About It displayed books written by present or past residents of Orange County. As an extension of this exhibit and to bring the works “alive,” readings of selections are being scheduled in several venues in Orange County.

Cultural Affairs/Lyceum at Orange County Community College is co-sponsoring an event during which writings by Langston Hughes and James Weldon Johnson, and music by John Rosamond Johnson with lyrics by his brother James Weldon Johnson will be featured. In addition, an introduction will be presented on Greenwood Forest Farms.

The program will take place in Morrison Hall Mansion, 115 South St, Middletown, NY on the college campus at 3pm on Sunday, February 22, 2009. Admission is free. Orange County Community College campus is ADA compliant.

Present-day Orange County residents will read and play. “Lion King” Actor Samuel Wright, of Walden, will read selections of poems and writings of Langston Hughes. Beverly Poyerd, pianist of Washingtonville, and Clarence Cooper, tenor and Greer Cooper, alto, of Newburgh will perform a musical interlude of music and lyrics written by the Johnson brothers, including “Lift Every Voice and Sing” which has come to be known in the United States as the African-American National Anthem. Greer Cooper will also read a selection of poems by James Weldon Johnson.

Hughes and the Johnsons were part-time residents of Greenwood Forest Farms, an early 20th C resort community for African- Americans in southern Orange County. They also were active in the Harlem Renaissance.

Paul Kwame Johnson of Warwick, will give an introduction on Greenwood Forest Farms. Paul Kwame Johnson is the Coordinator of the Visual and Performing Arts Institute at the Glenn E. Hines Memorial Boys and Girls Club of Newburgh. Dr. Clarence Cooper is the Assistant Principal of Newburgh Free Academy. Greer Cooper is a free-lance writer and events coordinator. Beverly Poyerd is a music therapist and piano instructor.

An Adirondack Poet–Chase Twichell

~ a Reading of her original works

Wednesday, April 22, 2009 @ 7pm
Morrison Hall Mansion

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Chase Twichell, poet

Admission: Free & open to the public

Nationally-recognized Poet Chase Twichell is coming Earth Day–Wednesday, April 22–to give a reading of her original works and to share experiences on writing poetry and getting it published, during two events. Both presentations are free and open to the public, and no registration is required. The campus is ADA compliant.

An Adirondack Poet–Chase Twichell ~ a Reading of her original works will take place at 7pm in Morrison Hall Mansion at 115 South Street.

The Secret Life of Poetry by Chase Twichell, poet ~a Master Class on approaching and writing poetry, and getting published, is scheduled to begin at noon in the Gilman Center for International Education which is located in the Library, at the corner of South Street and East Conkling Avenue.

Chase Twichell has devoted herself to writing poetry since her early teenage years.   During her college years, she continued to write poems while studying with Richard Wilbur at Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT and Hugh Ogden at Trinity College, Hartford, CT from which she graduated with a BA in 1973. She attended Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa, where she obtained her MFA in 1976. That was a very fertile, competitive atmosphere particularly because of the diverse group of poets there at the time.

She has taught at five colleges/universities and lived in the serene cold of the Adirondacks and the warm climes of the Gulf Coast and in the islands of the Caribbean as well as New Jersey, and produced poetry relative to each environment.  She has written and published seven books of poetry and co-edited a book on the writing of poetry.

Chase Twichell has been the recipient of numerous poetry honors and has also been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Her coming on Earth Day is quite appropriate as she is concerned about this planet/this world as demonstrated in her book The Ghost of Eden, a visionary sequence of interlocking meditations on the death of nature as we know it. These poems were directly influenced by both the New Jersey and the Adirondack landscapes.

Chase Twichell has received degrees from:

  • BA, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, 1973
  • MFA, University of Iowa, 1976

Has has taught at:

  • Princeton University
  • Goddard College
  • Warren Wilson College
  • University of Alabama
  • Hampshire College

Her Books of/on Poetry:

  • Horses Where the Answers Should Have Been: New and Selected Poems  (forthcoming—2010)
  • Dog Language (2005)
  • The Snow Watcher (1998)
  • The Ghost of Eden (1995)—a series of rages and elegies for the dying planet, influenced by both the New Jersey and the Adirondack landscapes
  • Perdido (1991)—infused with her time in the south, especially the Gulf Coast and in the islands of the Caribbean
  • The Odds (1986)
  • Northern Spy (1981)
  • co-edited (with Robin Behn) The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises From Poets Who Teach (1992)

Received Awards from:

  • Artists Foundation, Boston, MA,
  • New Jersey State Council on the Arts
  • American Academy of Arts and Letters
  • Alice Fay DiCastagnola Prize from the Poetry Society of America for The Snow Watcher

Fellowships from:

  • Guggenheim Foundation
  • National Endowment for the Arts

Poetry from the Rooftop of the World

~ a Reading from his original works by Yuyutsu RD Sharma

Thursday, November 12, 2009 @ 7pm
Morrison Hall Mansion

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Yuyutsu RD Sharma,
Nepalese poet and translator

Admission: Free & open to the public

Poetry the Rooftop of the World is the poetry event on the Fall 2009 Lyceum Events schedule. The program features Nepalese poet and translator Yuyutsu RD Sharma who will read from his original works beginning at 7pm on Thursday, November 12.  The setting for the reading is Morrison Hall Mansion on the campus of SUNY Orange County Community College, 115 South Street, Middletown, NY. Morrison Hall  is ADA compliant. This Lyceum event is sponsored in part by the Department of English, SUNY Orange.

Presently on tour in Canada, Yuyu Sharma will come to Orange County in mid-November. At Morrison Hall, he will first acquaint the audience with Nepal and its poetry, and then read selections from his eight poetry collections*.

Sharma travels extensively for readings and workshops. Some of the cities where he has read his works include New York, London, Belfast, Dublin, Amsterdam, Bonn, Frankfurt, and New Delhi.  His writings can be found in eight languages including his native Nepali as well as German, Dutch, French, Italian, Spanish, Slovenian, and Hebrew. Currently, he edits Pratik, A Magazine of Contemporary Writing and contributes literary columns to Nepal's leading daily, The Himalayan Times and Newsfront Weekly and The Kathmandu Post. He has also completed his first novel and a book of his prose writing on the ongoing political turbulence in Nepal entitled, Annapurnas and Stains of Blood. In addition to his books, his works have been published in several periodicals-- Poetry Review, Chanrdrabhaga, Sodobnost, Amsterdam Weekly, Indian Literature, Irish Pages, Delo, Omega, Howling Dog Press, Exiled Ink, Iton77, Little Magazine, The Telegraph, Indian Express and Asiaweek. Additionally, he has  launched a literary movement, Kathya Kayakalpa (Content Metamorphosis) in Nepali poetry.

Yuyu Sharma is the recipient of fellowships and grants from The Rockefeller Foundation, Ireland Literature Exchange, Trubar Foundation, Slovenia, The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature, and The Foundation for the Production and Translation of Dutch Literature.

*Published poetry collections:

  • Space Cake, Amsterdam, & Other Poems from Europe and America
  • Annapurna Poems
  • Everest Failures
  • www.WayToEverest.de: A photographic and Poetic Journey to the Foot of Everest with German photographer Andreas Stimm
  • Jezero Fewa in Konj
  • Poemes de l’ Himalayas

FILMS

Winter-Spring 2009 Film Series: Orange County Connections

The 2009 Lyceum Winter-Spring Film Series is being presented in conjunction with the Orange County Citizens Foundation. Orange County Connections features films which have been written by or about present or past residents of Orange County.

Orange County Citizens Foundation Logo

Carousel

February 4, 2009 – Wednesday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

Carousel film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Orange County Connections" series and will be introduced by Chris Farlekas, columnist & arts advocate.

Starring: Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones

Director: Henry King

Book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II

Carousel was released as a film in February 1956. The book of the 1945 stage musical and the lyrics were written by Oscar Hammerstein II who lived in Tuxedo Park. The musical score was written by Richard Rodgers who, in his autobiography Musical Stages, said it was his favorite musical.

Not your typical 1950s musical, this often overlooked Rodgers and Hammerstein classic takes an abusive husband and gives him one last chance to make things right with his wife and daughter. Gordon MacRae stars as Billy, a lowlife carny barker, and Shirley Jones plays his wife, Julie, an innocent girl who's fallen for the wrong guy. After getting himself killed, Billy is allowed out of purgatory for one last shot at redemption.

Carousel was adapted from Ferenc Molnar's 1909 play Liliom, transplanting the Budapest setting of Molnar's play to a New England fishing village. Some of the scenes were shot in Boothbay, ME. The show includes the hit musical numbers "If I Loved You," "June Is Bustin' Out All Over," and "You'll Never Walk Alone." Carousel was innovative for its time, being one of the first musicals to contain a tragic plot. It also gave the opportunity for Oscar Hammerstein II to explore societal attitudes and prejudices in a musical play. The main social themes are social class, hypocrisy, and conduct.

Carousel was adapted as a Cinemascope 55 film in 1956. Frank Sinatra was originally cast to play Billy Bigelow. He even pre-recorded part of the soundtrack. But when he arrived on the set, Sinatra discovered that he had to shoot the scenes two times: one for regular Cinemascope and the other for CinemaScope 55. Sinatra, who never liked to do two takes of a scene, walked away from the set and said: “You’re not getting two Sinatras for the price of one”. Ironically, just after he left, the producers found a way to film the scene once on 55mm, then transfer it onto 35mm; thus, the film did not have to be shot twice.  

Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre is at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. It is ADA compliant.

High Society

February 11, 2009 – Wednesday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

High Society film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Orange County Connections" series and will be introduced by Barry Plaxen, D&H CANVAS managing editor.

Starring: Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and Frank Sinatra

Director: Charles Walters

Written by John Patrick

The screenplay writer of High Society was John Patrick who lived part-time in Cornwall.

High Society was released in July 1956. In this musical reworking of The Philadelphia Story, Newport, RI blueblood Bing Crosby tries to win back his ex-wife, "ice goddess" Grace Kelly, while Frank Sinatra and Celeste Holm (reporters for Snoop Magazine) gum up the works. The movie portrays the lifestyles of the rich with a good dose of humor. Cole Porter wrote the score (which includes the Oscar-winning song "True Love"), and Louis Armstrong and his band are on hand to syncopate all the shenanigans.

Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre is at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. It is ADA compliant.

Cop Land

February 23, 2009 – Monday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

Cop Land film poster

This event has been rescheduled from January 28, due to inclement weather.

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Orange County Connections" series and will be introduced by Germain Lussier, Times Herald-Record writer.

Cop Land is a 1997 film written and directed by James Mangold who grew up in the Worley Heights section of the Town of Blooming Grove and attended Washingtonville High School. Much of the background material is based on Mangold’s acquaintances in his teenage years as many of his neighbors were NYPD officers.

The setting is Garrison, a small town in New Jersey, not far from Manhattan, where many NYPD officers reside. Sylvester Stallone plays hearing-impaired Sheriff Freddy Heflin. Robert De Niro is NYPD Internal Affairs Investigator Mo Tilden.

James Mangold studied film/video at the California Institute of the Arts, and acting at CalArts School of Theater. After finishing his degree there and working for Disney as a writer/director, Mangold studied and secured an MA from the Film Division of Columbia University's School of the Arts.

Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre is at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. It is ADA compliant.

I, The Jury

March 3, 2009 – Tuesday @7pm
Assembly Room 221, Newburgh Campus, One Washington Center

I, The Jury film poster

I, The Jury film poster

Paul Ellis

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Orange County Connections" series.

6pm - Reading by Paul Ellis of "The Night I Died," a Mickey Spillane short story-radio play

7pm - Screening of the film I, The Jury

A dramatic reading of "The Night I Died" will be given by Paul Ellis at 6pm, followed by a screening of the film I, The Jury, at 7pm. Both the radio play and the film are based on works by Mickey Spillane.

Radio plays, also known as radio drama, are a form of audio storytelling broadcast on radio. With no visual component, radio drama depends on dialogue, music and sound effects to help the listener imagine the story.

Radio plays achieved widespread popularity within a decade of their initial development in the 1920s. By the 1940s, they were a leading international popular entertainment. With the advent of television in the 1950s, however, they lost some of their popularity.

Paul Ellis is the producer/director of the Air Pirates Radio Theater. He is a resident of Sugar Loaf.

I, the Jury is a 1982 film based on the best selling detective novel of the same name by Mickey Spillane who lived in Newburgh. The film screening begins at 7pm.

The plot involves Private Eye Mike Hammer discovering that his best friend, Jack Williams, a one-armed detective, has been murdered. Hammer's subsequent investigation has him become a one-man vigilante squad who seeks vengeance on the person responsible for Williams' death.

Then, a serial rapist is involved as well as a sex therapy clinic headed up by sexy Dr. Charlotte Bennett. The film plot also contains elements not in the novel, such as government conspiracies and mind-control techniques by the CIA and the Mafia.

The film initially received mixed reviews, and was criticized for having too much nudity and violence.

Starring in the film are Armand Assante as Mike Hammer and Barbara Carrera as Dr. Charlotte Bennett. Armand Assante has a residence in Blooming Grove.

The Newburgh Campus is located at One Washington Center.

The venue is Assembly Room 221 (ADA compliant).

Yankee Doodle Dandy

March 10, 2009 – Tuesday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

Yankee Doodle Dandy film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Orange County Connections" series and will be introduced by Steve Harpst, Student Activities Director.

Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) is a biographical film about George M. Cohan who lived in Highland Mills. The actor-singer-dancer-playwright-songwriter-producer-theatre owner-director-choreographer was known as “The Man Who Owns Broadway.”  Starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston and Richard Whorf, and featuring Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp and Jeanne Cagney, the movie was written by Robert Buckner and Edmund Joseph, and directed by Michael Curtiz. This nostalgic, shamelessly-patriotic movie is considered to be one of Hollywood's greatest, grandest, and slickest musicals.

The film won Academy Awards for Best Actor in a Leading Role (James Cagney), Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture and Best Sound Recording. It was nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Walter Huston), Best Director, Best Film Editing for George Amy, Best Picture and Best Writing, Original Story. In 1993, Yankee Doodle Dandy was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

The black and white film was the first computer-colorized film released by entrepreneur Ted Turner in 1985.

Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre is at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. It is ADA compliant.

The Subject Was Roses

April 14, 2009 – Tuesday – Introduction@6:15pm, Screening@7pm
Assembly Room 221, Newburgh Campus, One Washington Center

I, The Jury film poster

I, The Jury film poster

Paul Ellis

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

The 2009 Lyceum Winter-Spring Film Series is being presented in conjunction with the Orange County Citizens Foundation.  Orange County Connections features films which have been written by or about present or past residents of Orange County.

6:15pm - Introduction by Frank D. Gilroy, playwright, screenwriter, author

7pm - Screening of the film The Subject Was Roses

The Subject Was Roses is a 1968 film by Frank D. Gilroy adapted from his 1964 play of the same title. The film director was Ulu Grosbard. The film is a rare faithful adaptation of the play, employing most of the cast and crew of the stage play.

In the screenplay, two of the play's three original actors, Jack Albertson and Martin Sheen, starred in the film version. Nettie is played by Patricia Neal who won a nomination for Best Actress. Albertson won an Oscar for best supporting actor.

The play The Subject Was Roses was written by Frank D. Gilroy and opened on Broadway in 1964 with Jack Albertson, Martin Sheen, and Irene Dailey. This was his first Broadway play, and it received high praise from critics and, indeed, won many awards, including the Outer Critics Circle Award, the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, a Tony Award for best play, and the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1965.

The play/screenplay is a realistic drama, and the set makes an important contribution to the theme. Since this is a family that has difficulty talking openly with each other, Gilroy uses a technique whereby in conversations they talk completely across each other—that is, one person is barely listening to the other and carries on his own line of thought.

Timmy Cleary returns home from his service during World War II. While he seems to vindicate himself in his father's eyes for surviving the war, his drinking and cursing disturb his mother. Though his parents, John and Nettie, seem to be happy, the peace proves to be a facade. Soon old emotional wounds and unresolved marital problems resurface. Caught in the middle, Timmy feels responsible for their squabbling, but can see no way to resolve their problems.

Frank Daniel Gilroy was born on October 13, 1925, to Bettina Vasti and Frank B. Gilroy in the Bronx, New York. He was graduated from De Witt Clinton High School in the Bronx in 1943, after which he joined the US Army. During World War II, he served for two and a half years with the eighty-ninth infantry division, including eighteen months in Europe. A magna cum laude graduate of Dartmouth College, Frank D. Gilroy completed his education at the Yale School of Drama with a grant he received from Dartmouth. He entered television as a writer in the early 1950s, contributing to the many live dramatic anthologies of the era such as Kraft Theatre, Omnibus, and Playhouse 90. In 1962, he won the Obie Award for his off-Broadway piece Who'll Save the Plowboy?. Then, in 1970, Frank Gilroy made his movie-directing bow with the Manhattan-filmed Desperate Characters. He has since directed such films as the revisionist western From Noon Till Three (1976), and the serio-comedy The Luckiest Man in the World (1989). He has also written many short plays and made independent films and, from that experience, he wrote a book I Wake Up Screaming –everything to know about independent filmmaking. His latest book is Writing for Love and/or Money. Frank D. Gilroy is a longtime resident of Blooming Grove. His screenwriter/director son Tony used his house for scenes in the 2007 film Michael Clayton.

The Newburgh Campus is located at One Washington Center.

The venue is Assembly Room 221 (ADA compliant).

Fall 2009 Film Series: Scary Movies

Scary Movies Logo

Psycho

September 25, 2009 – Friday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

Psycho film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Scary Movies" series.

It will be introduced by Chris Farlekas, columnist & arts advocate.

Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre is at the corner of Wawayanda and East Conkling Avenues, Middletown, NY. It is ADA compliant.

Halloween

October 29, 2009 – Friday @7pm
Assembly Room 221, Newburgh Campus

Halloween film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Scary Movies" series.

It will be introduced by Mike McCoy, Instructor of History, Global Studies Department, SUNY Orange.

The Newburgh Campus is located at One Washington Center.

The venue is Assembly Room 221 (ADA compliant).

Nosferatu

October 30, 2009 – Friday @7:15pm
Orange Hall Gallery

Nosferatu film posterPhto: description follows

Dan Bradley

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Scary Movies" series.

Chris Farlekas, film expert, will be introducing the Silent Vampire Movie Nosferatu which will be screened in Orange Hall Gallery on Friday, October 30 at 7:15pm. Dan Bradley of Matamoras, PA will accompany this film classic on the beautiful baby grand piano.

Nosferatu, starring Max Schreck and directed by F. W. Murnau, is known as one of the most compelling movies about the vampire myth, if not the most influential. As an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel it made artistic changes to character names and locale names in an attempt to fly under the radar. What was produced has enchanted lovers of the vampire mythology and other lovers of the grim and horrific since its release in 1922.

Evil Dead 2

November 13, 2009 – Friday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

Evil Dead 2 film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

Evil Dead 2 is a 1987 American cult comedy horror film.

The film was directed by Sam Raimi, written by Sam Raimi and Scott Spiegel, and produced by Rob Tapert. Bruce Campbell starred as Ash Williams and Denise Bixler played his girlfriend Linda who turns into a deadite after a recorded incantation of the "Book of the Dead" unleashes an evil force that soon takes possession of her.

Introduction by Steve Harpst, Director of Student Activities

This film is part of the Fall Films 2009 Series: Scary Movies.

Bride of Frankenstein

December 4, 2009 – Friday @7:15pm
Harriman Hall 111 Film Theatre

Bride of Frankenstein film poster

Admission: $2 general; free all students from any institution

This film is part of the "Scary Movies" series.

It will be introduced by Steve Harpst, Director of Student Activities.

Bride of Frankenstein is a 1935 horror film, the first sequel to the influential Frankenstein (1931).

Director: James Whale

Starring:

  • Boris Karloff as The Monster
  • Elsa Lanchester in the dual role of his mate and Mary Shelley
  • Colin Clive as Henry Frankenstein
  • Ernest Thesiger as Doctor Septimus Pretorius

The film follows on immediately from the events of the first film, and is rooted in a subplot of the original novel, Frankenstein (1818). In the film, a chastened Henry Frankenstein abandons his plans to create life, only to be tempted and finally coerced by the Monster, encouraged by Henry's old mentor Dr Pretorius, into constructing a mate for him. The Bride rejects the Monster however, resulting in her death, that of Pretorius, and apparently the Monster's own death, when he destroys Henry's laboratory.

Bride of Frankenstein was released to critical and popular acclaim, although it encountered difficulties with some state and national censorship boards. Since its release the film's reputation has grown, and it is hailed as Whale's masterpiece. Modern film scholars, noting Whale's homosexuality and that of others involved in the production, have found a gay sensibility in the film, although a number of Whale's associates have dismissed the idea.

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Contact Us:
Dorothy Szefc
Coordinator of Cultural Affairs
(845) 341-4891
cultural@sunyorange.edu

All Cultural Affairs Events are open to the public and all buildings are universally accessible.

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